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Full text of "Torch 1997"

NKHWM 



A 
PLACE 



To Go 8 



To Belong 34 



To Run <5f Flay . . . . 72 



To Make Friends . ... 96 



To Find Yourself 134 



To Grow 



A 

PLACE 

TO GROW 

IQQ7 Tohd 

4000 Daupk St 
i<kAL 36608 




Spring Hill College 



• ■ ■':,: - ' 




A PLACE TO GROW 1 



A 




wrowth could be considered a physical sensation, yet 
it could also be experienced emotionally and mentally. 
Twelve hundred students attended Spring Hill Col- 
lege for this very reason. They came for an introduc- 
tion into the real world, to escape their parents, to find 
out who they were, and a few actually came for some 
intellectual growth. 

As they experienced this personal growth, much 
was changing all around them. U.S. News and World 
Report's tenth annual issue of America's Best Colleges 
ranked Spring Hill College as the 12th best college in 
the South, an improvement of one spot since the year 
before. 

Even the American government attempted to 
change. Many Spring Hill students participated in the 



SEED 



presidential election by either going to the polls or 
voting by absentee ballots. However, Americans did 
not feel that they need too much of a change as they 
reelected Bill Clinton to serve as president. 

Students could still experience a difference in lead- 
ership. At the dedication of Fairway Apartments, 
Father Rewak, Spring Hill's own president, an- 
nounced his resignation. While the change would not 
take place until the following year, the announcement 
was a blow to students and faculty alike. 

Therefore, change was rampant on the campus and 
in many other areas of student life. While change is 
known to make people strong, it is strength that they 
use to grow. Students felt this change and prepared 
for growth. 



IS PLANTED 



r, 



n the spirit of peace and love, Claire 
Darbonne and Brandi Stapp dance to 
"Freewarer Junction". Phi Mu's Woodstock 
provided an atmosphere that incited the 
peace and harmony of the sixties. 




2 A PLACE TO GROW 




L 



tting herself be wheeled along , Ashley 
Buckhaults scrambles for the finish line. 
Horacio Wheelock and Ashley did not 
come in first place but had a lot of fun at 
Hall Olympics. 



s, 



)tudents get down on January 31, 1997 
at the Mardi Gras ball. Yet they had all 
night to party since the parade rhe nexr day 
was not until one p.m. 




PERSONAL GROWTH 3 



LAYING 




T 



Otudents were not the only ones to grow on the 
Spring Hill campus. Returning students as well as 
new ones found a new habitat springing up all around 
them. Some of these new growths started from the 
ground up while others were simply a new addition to 
an old tradition. 

The first new sprout was the Arlene Mitchell 
Theatre. It was built as an improvement for the old 
College Inn. However, four other major structures 
graced the campus. Three of them were the Fairway 
Apartments. These were used to house juniors and 
seniors with good academic standing. The other major 
construction on campus was the Recreation Center. As 
the campus community had no gym other than the 
one 



Down A 



below Quinlin Hall and the basketball teams were 
forced to use St. Paul's court, a new facility for sports 
was deemed necessary. 

While five new buildings grew on Spring Hill, 
some changes were made to old ones. O'Leary Hall 
had been used for years as the only dorm for freshmen 
women. Yet, it was changed so that all female 
freshmen had a choice of residence and O'Leary 
opened in the fall as a woman's single room only 
dormitory. As well, the stacks in Byrne Memorial 
Library became closed to all students when they were 
declared a fire hazard. Students were forced to learn 
the computer system and rely on the librarians to 
retrieve their material. The beloved Cloister also re- 
ceived a facelift to accomodate students' wishes. 

Adaptation to the new habitat was not hard for 
students. They simply accepted the new growth. 



FOUNDATION I 



he Arlene Mitchell Theater is one of the 
new growths on campus, even though it 
was finished before the end of the last 
school year. It was a much needed 
improvement from the old College Inn that 
had been previously used for campus 
productions. 




4 A PLACE TO GROW 




he slow progression of the Recreation 
Center seemed tedious at times. However, 
brick by brick, the structure soon became a 
full fledged reality and a welcomed addition 
to the campus. 



eturnmg students saw the beginnings ot 
Fairway Apartments before school let out 
the year before and the many changes that 
took place over the summer were obvious. 
The stacks of wood that they had seen were 
suddenly fully stocked new homes for some 
juniors and seniors. 




PHYSICAL GROWTH 5 



A 




Is In 
Ik 




L/hange was taking place all around. Some students 
felt the growth as soon as they stepped on campus 
while others saw a subtle grow in themselves. Even 
more just noticed a difference in the atmosphere. 

Freshmen were aware of the changes they had to 
endure for the transition from high school to college. 
Brian Cox felt that the changes were small and said, 
"Being here is pretty much as I expected because my 
sister went to college. The teachers are different from 
high school, though, because they are more personal 
and are on the level of the students." The change for 
most, like Brian, was pretty simple. 

Other students felt a more significant growth in 
themselves. Joey Reeves was one of these students. He 



PLACE 



stated, "I have done a lot of growing up since I've 
come here. I think that I've become a more responsi- 
ble adult." 

Personal growth was not the only thing on which 
students commented. Kent Zirlott felt the impact. 
"I'm really glad that I get to live in the new apart- 
ments before I graduate. Getting to spend my senior 
year in them is great." The Fairway apartments gave 
juniors and seniors a chance to get a feeling of 
independence while continuing to live on campus. 

Each student found that going to Spring Hill 
provided a little more than just intellectual growth. 
Whatever form they grew into, students knew that 
they had found a place to grow. 



T, 



he fun of SHC's unique Mardi Gras 
gave some students a reason to go to Spring 
Hill. That reason was clearly exhibited by 
Alfonso Cueto as he rode as king of Spring 
Hill's Mardi Gras parade on February 1. 

J V lany students found that membership 
gave them a sense of belonging and a 
group in which to grow. Brandi Stapp and 
Angelle Whitman helped out their Phi Mu 
sisters and prepared for the first night of 
sorority rush in the Cloister. 




[ hei 



here is more than one way to make 
friends on campus, and classes provide an 
excuse to sttike up a convetsation. Chris 
Zingarelli and Charles Crow ate lunch in 
the Cloister together at 10:30am to talk 
about their Asian Literature class. 



TO GROW 



6 A PLACE TO GROW 




very Spring Hill srudenr is given a 
chance to run and play and inrramurals 
insure that. AI Gonzales lunged after Trey 
McGill in a game or intramural football. 



quiet cotner or rhe Commuter lounge- 
gives Amabel Fulgencio a chance to collect 
and find herself. This time alone allowed 
her to finish reading A Doll's House before 
her 10:40 class with Dr. Michael Kaffer. 




STUDENT PERSPECTIVES 7 





Like 




A 

«^>tudents may have 
come to Spring Hill be- 
cause it was a great place 
to grow, but there many 
other events and reasons 
that convinced them and 
let them know that it 
was also a great place to 

PLACE 

go. From Oktoberfest, to 
Mardi Gras, to Campus 
Ministry, there was never 
a lack of something to do 
on the campus. All this 
ensured that everyone al- 
ways had plenty of fun. 
Far better than a dog's 
life was a student's life. 

TOGO 



A 

*S Itter Emily Stevens buys Robbie 
Corely for S 1 1 at Alpha Kappa Alpha's 
Valentines Day Bachelor Auction, they 
watch as other students make their 
purchases in the Cloister. Katie Genovese 
soon bid $10 on Alex McDermott, and he 
became her Valentine date. 



Ocl. 



elect members of Tri-Delta sorority 
perform in a dance and lip synch to 
"Singing in the Rain", their theme for the 
Mardi Gras Parade on February 1 in front 
of Walsh Hall. This performance tied them 
for first place with Phi Mil's "South 
Pacific". 




8 \ PLACE TO GROW 




STUDENT LIFE DIVISION 9 




1 O A PLACE TO GROW 



"O 



r reshmen watch on as Resident Assistants 
present skits that pottray the humorous side 
o campus life. This production in the 
Cafeteria was one of the many activities of 
Dtientation planned for new students, as 
A'ell as an introduction to their RA's. 



■Jince Circle K International's "One Fish, 
I"wo Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish" party was 
me of the first events of Orientation, 
ncoming students made the most of it and 
ried to meet as many new people as they 
:ould. Stephen Sparks took his chance and 
nade a few friend on the porch of the 
3adger's Den. 




h The Places You'll 
Go" was the theme for freshman 
orientation, and oh, the places they 
went. Freshman orientation provid- 
ed a warm welcome for the class of 
2000. It kicked off on Thursday, 
August 22, with a band party put 
on by Circle K in the Badger's Den. 
The students enjoyed an evening of 
music, pizza, and new faces. Mark 
Wilson said "The party was worth- 
while because because it gave me a 
chance to meet everybody." 

Throughout orientation, various 
seminars and activities were held for 
both students and their parents. 
Freshman, Ellen Fulgham admit- 
ted, "I didn't attend some of the 
seminars, but if I had to do it all 
over again, I would go to all of 
them." 

The weekend included an out- 
door barbecue and a Casino Night 
complete with black jack tables and 
plenty of door prizes. Mimi Finzel 
claimed, "Casino Night was a 
blast." 

On the last day before classes 
began, the freshmen boarded buses 



and headed across the bay to Camp 
Beckwith for Escape. There, stu- 
dents got down and dirty as they 
tackled ropes courses and other ob- 
stacles in the blazing August sun. 
Students also enjoyed swimming 
and socializing. Freshman, Colleen 
Schmelzer said, "Escape was a lot of 



The Beginning 



OF IT ALL 

by Kelly Dyson 



fun because it revealed everyone's 
true personality. "The day ended 
with a unifying candlelight vigil, 
concluding a day filled with chal- 
lenge and many rewards. 

Orientation was a huge success 
overall. Gary Albert, a new student, 
stated, "The weekend helped to 
ease the transition from high school 
to college and made me feel more at 
home." 




r reparing for the arrival of the Freshmen 
on campus is not all that it is cracked up to 
be. Melvin Crump fell victim to being the 
example for the RA's First Aid training. 



FRESHMAN ORIENTATION 11 



A 



is the freshman class was 
welcomed to Spring Hill College on 
that hot Thursday afternoon of Au- 
gust 18, they were not only nervous 
about meeting their roommate for 
the upcoming year but also about 
their living quarters for the next 
nine months. On the flip side, up- 
perclassmen were glad to be reunit- 
ed with their friends after the three 
month long break, and "movin' on 



From A Pit 

TO A PALACE 



by Maria Walley 



up" was a familiar phrase of juniors 
and seniors who were excited and 
ready to move into the new Fairway 
Apartments. Junior, Amy Gonzales 
was excited not only to move on 
campus for the first time but also 
into the best residency Spring Hill 
had to olfer, ' ' Living in Fairway is a 
different experience because I truly 
feel I am on my own by having to 
cook and clean my own apartment, 
yet I am still on campus." 

However, freshmen and sopho- 
mores were still stuck with commu- 
nity bathrooms, small rooms, unfa- 
vorable roommates, and, of course, 
Marri-rott. Freshman, Colleen 
Schmelzer said, "The community 
bathrooms are yuck, but hey, you 
got to keep clean." Mobile Hall 
resident, Stephen Sparks had the 
same- 



opinion and complained about the 
wrenching smell, trying to distin- 
guish if someone had died or if the 
smell was just coming from the 
bathroom. 

On the other hand, two fresh- 
men, Kelly Flynn and Peter Lau- 
rence, had positive views of dorm 
life. Kelly was grateful for the girls 
she lived with because of the close 
friends she had made at her new 
Spting Hill home. Mobile native, 
Peter Laurence quoted, "Dorm life 
is just like home except I have a 
room to myself, I stay out as late as 
I want, and I do my homework 
whenever 1 want. Hmm...I guess 
dorm life isn't like home." 

O'Leary dorm veterans were a 
little concerned about the new dorm 
changes for freshman girls. With 
these girls moving into other dorms, 
O'Leary became a single-room 
dorm. Sophomore, Kristen Kam- 
mer showed her concern, "The girls 
won't have the cluster areas between 
rooms to bond and meet other res- 
idents." Walsh Hall resident, Elise 
Seymore had the same worry, but 
stated, "The girls will now be able 
to meet more upperclassmen." 

While dorm life could be the 
pits, two Toolen Hall residents that 
found fun somewhere in the middle- 
were roommates Laura Dicas and 
Amy Goreham. Laura was grateful 
for the great view of the soccer 
players from her room while Amy 
found cheap enjoyment by sliding 
down the hall in her socks instead of 
roller-blading down the hall like her 
neighbors. So, whether you were 
lounging on the balcony of your 
apartment or turning cartwheels in 
O'Leary's Pit, fun could be found 
living on Spring Hill's campus. 



I_ven though Maggie Fernandez lives in 
Toolen Hall, she gets a real taste of Fairway 
life when she uses Izzy Wilson's apartment, 
208, for the weekend. When Maggie had 
finished vacuuming the place, the vacuum 
bag broke and she had to Starr all over 
again. 



A 



part of dorm life is rhe essential hall 
meering. Resident Assisrants, such as 
Richard Foore of Murray Hall, and 
residents, like Perer Laurence, were expecred 
ro attend those meetings. 







12 A PLACE TO GROW 







DORM LIFE 13 



o 



'ne of the evening's main attractions is 
the band Red Dye #9. The group, made up 
mostly of SHC students, was a roaring 
success according to Leigh Ellen Hall. 



O warms of Spring Hill Students surround 
the stage set up in Quinlin Quad tor 
Oktoberfest. No one traveled far, for fear 
of missing one beat of Red Dye #9. 




s 



'umo wrestling, a velcro wall, 
food, and two great bands were just 
a few of the reasons students chose 



A Total Fest 

OF FUN 

by Shivonne Edwards 



to attend Spring Hill College's an- 
nual Oktoberfest. 

This event occurred on October 
4th. According to Tanner Johnson, 
president of the Student Govern- 
ment Association, "Scheduling was 




very difficult because Bayfest fell on 
the same weekend. Trying to re- 
schedule was impossible with Fall 
Break, retreats, etc. Despite stu- 
dents' desires to go elsewhere, the 
whole event went very well." 

The bands that played were Red 
Dye #9 and Billy Pi/grim. Cris Kra- 
mer, a member of Red Dye #9, 
said, "We got to play with the 
other band's equipment, which was 
worth thousands of dollars. It was 
great!!" 

Oktoberfest was a little different 
this time. "Students," according to 
Cedric Fernandes, "were not al- 
lowed to bring couches to the event. 
It was also shorter because of 
Bayfest. It used to be two-day 
event." 

Kramer stated, ''Overall, 
Oktoberfest was a good time had by 
all." 




14 A PLACE TO GROW 



tting down to the sound of Billy 
Pilgrim is Horacio Wheelock and Jennifer 
Osiecki. They couldn't keep their toes fro 
tapping. 




OKTOBERFEST 15 



T 



o commute or not to com- 
mute was the question tor many 
Spring Hill students. Those that 
made the decision to do so found 
that not living on campus produced 
its share ot problems. Commuters 
often felt forgotten and left out 



The Trouble 

WITH TRAVEL 



by Heather Bell 



R, 



kae Williams and Heather Bell wait in 
the Quinlin Parking lot for Janna LeGault 
on a wet January morning. When Janna 
finally got out of dass. Heather and Rat- 
were ready to find somewhere warm and 
dry to eat lunch. 



when they were not involved in 
organizations and especially had 
a hard time finding out about 
campus events and activities. 
Commuters, as well, had the 
problem of finding a parking 
space each day. 

When on campus, many 
commuters felt lost in a sea ot 
faces who seemed to know eve- 
ryone else. Kelly Gartman, a 
veteran commuter, commented, 
"I've been at Spring Hill for 
three years and I only know a 
few people.'' 



Being "in the know" about cam- 
pus happenings was hard for com- 
muters. Lori Johnson remarked, 
"It's hard to find out about events if 
you don't go to the Student Center 
a lot." Janna LeGault had a similar 
problem. "When it comes to cam- 
pus activities I feel left out because I 
don't know what's going on. The 
commuter bulletin board in Quinlin 
is hardly ever updated." 

Those who felt left out as a com- 
muter should follow some friendly 
advice, "It's hard to get to know 
people if you're not involved," stat- 
ed Shauna Strickland. 

Parking was a horrible ordeal for 
most commuters. Quinlin Hall's 
parking lot was not big enough. By 
the time many stuelents arrived, 
they had to park down in "the 
hole" by the baseball field. Kelly 
Miears related the experience, "The 
parking reminds me of BelAir Mall 
at Christmas time." 

Commuting was a choice that 
many students were forced to make. 
It made it hard to get involved 
because there was not enough 
publicity of some campus activities. 
Therefore, everyone should take the 
time to help out these fellow stu- 
dents, the forgotten commuters. 




V V ithout a 



. dorm to retire to or any 
homework to do, Rebecca Cox submits to 
her weariness and takes a nap in the 
Student Center. Even though the couch 
there was not the most comfortable, she 
took what she could get and slept until her 
next class. 




16 STUDENT LIFE 



V In. r\ I Watts gets to school |usr before 

her 9:30 class and still finds .1 parking 
space close to Quinlin Hall. She was lucky 
that day since noi much later the clouds 
mist forth with .1 downpour. 




COMMUTER LIFE 17 



l—very year the Panhellenic Council 
presents a Tea and fashion show for Spring 
Hill females and their mothers. Dressed in 
evening attite, Jessica Starr was escorted by 
her father. Dr. Mark Staff, on October 26, 
for the annual show. 

J eff Salsiccia has an early morning on 
Sunday, October 27, as he helps the other 
members of the Knights of Columbus 
make breakfast for Parent's Weekend. By 
the end of the morning Jeff was covered 
with flour from making bengiets. 




T, 



he Fabulous Boogie Kings rock the 

Louise Moorer Commons on October 26 

for parents and students alike. Fathers and 

daughters as well as mothers and sons took 
the opportunity to dance the night away. 




18 A PLACE TO GROW 



D, 



inner at Marriot becomes a family 
experience on October 25, as students 
bring their parents for a taste of real 
college food. Scott Salathe and his parent 
enjoy their time and meal together in the 
cafeteria. 





P 



arent's Weekend was a great 
success. Held on October 25-27, it 
was an event enjoyed by all in at- 
tendance. 

"It was nice to see all the stu- 
dents and their parents together." . . 
. . . Mende Rich 

"It was a well-planned and or- 
ganized event the my parents and I 
enjoyed." Stephanie Ar- 
nold 

"The activities planned were 
great and overall a lot of fun." .... 
. Jabaria Willis 

' 'This was my first year to attend 
Parent's Weekend, but it definitely 

won't be my last." Thedia 

Mitchell 



"It was a great activity that I'd 
love to see the whole campus partic- 
ipate in." Princess Spencer 



A Family 

AFFAIR 
by Latrese Johnson 



Everyone who came and took 
part in Parent's Weekend had a 
great time. 



PARENT'S WEEKEND 19 



Lee Ann Kincaid, Barbie Martino, Karen 
Trujillo, John Steen, Mane Forsdick, 
Angelle Whitman, and Olivia Marino 
present the drama <>t Christ's birth for 
students, faculty, and adopted families. 
This presentation in St. Joseph's Chapel 
was the center attraction of Campus 
Ministry's December 5, Christmas on the 
Hill. 



C 



ampus Ministry Vigil committee 
member, Maria Walley, helped light the 
candles in St. Joseph's ( hapel. Jennifer 
Scalici and Maggie Tsaltas were two of 
the many people whose candles she lit on 
December 5. 




s. 



inging carols at St. Joseph's Chapel in 
the Mobile Hall section are Robert Poher 
and Billy Brookshire. The gentlemen from 
Mobile Hall sang "We Three Kings" on 
December 5. 




v_7anta's elves pose before getting to work. 
Buck Johnson, a member of Campus 
Ministry, recruited his friends to help hand 
out candy and bring a smile and Christmas 
cheer on December 5 to diners in the 
Cafeteria. 




20 A PLACE TO GROW 



44 



it 




o 




er star ul wonder..." 
This familiar retrain to "We Three 
Kings" was heard throughout St. 
Joseph's Chapel on December °)th. 
Spring Hill students and metro Mo- 
bile families gathered to share in the 
joy of Christmas. 

Each year, Spring Hill College's 
Christmas on the Hill, sponsored by 
Campus Ministry, adopts families 
from Catholic Social Services, be- 
comes aquainted with them, in the 
spirit of Christmas gives them 
presents, and treats them to a 
Christmas meal with carroling and a 
party. 

In charge of this extravaganza 
was Todd Wimpey of Campus 
Ministry. He said, "Approximately 
$4,000 was collected from the 
Spring Hill College community to 
contribute to the eleven families we 
took on. The largest family had 
eight children.'' 



"It was a very enjoyable, worth- 
while experience. I liked the service 
work that we did to help out the 
community," explained Kendal 
Balkom. Wimpey also said, 



One Reason 

FOR THE SEASON 



by Shivonne Edwards 



"Compared with the year before, 
from what I've heard, participation 
was as good, if not better in terms 
of numbers attending the vigil and 
Badger Den party." 

All in all, Christmas on the Hill 
was a benefit to the community and 
a lot of fun for Spring Hill students. 




T. 



Si,',. 



Dasting matshmallows for their s'mores 
arc Morgan Chipella and Claire Darborne. 
Tlit bonfire took place after the Vigil in St. 
Joseph's Chapel on December 5 behind the 
Badgers Den. 



CHRISTMAS ON THE HILL 21 



c 



.lapping along with the crowd, Alvin 
West and Sarah Fruin participate in 
Mobile's annual Martin Luther King, Jr. 
March on January 20. Along the way they 
sang and clapped to songs such as "We 
Shall Overcome" and "Amen". 




H 



le had a dream and that 
dream continued. For on Monday, 
January 20, Spring Hill students 
were invited to take part in Martin 
Luther King, Jr. Day through sev- 
eral activities. Some students did 
indeed join in the remembrance and 
celebration of perhaps America's 
greatest leader in the pursuit of 
equal tights. 

The day began with a march the 
through the streets of downtown 



The Dream 

IS ALIVE 

by Hope Lucas 



Mobile. Sarah Fruin found the 
40 minute hike to be more than 
fun. "I had the best time clap- 
ping and singing to 'Amen', but 
as the march came to an end I 
was lucky enough to get to meet 
a kind, old lady who used to 
baby-sit for Mr. King." 

While Alvin West was not as 
lucky as Sarah, he was still in- 
spired by the march and said, 
"I'm from Mobile and haven't 
participated in the march since I 
was five or six. 



so I was blown away by the impres- 
sive amount of people from the 
community.'' 

In the evening, a vigil was of- 
fered on the Spring Hill campus. 
Both Jamila Smith and Melvin 
Crump said that the vigil had a 
special meaning. For Jamila, "The 
vigil was a culmination of cultural 
enlightenment and spiritual aware- 
ness. It said a lot about our campus 
and the strifes that had been made, 
but also with the turnout we re- 
ceived, it showed where we need to 
go and be." Melvin, as well, enjoy- 
ed the experience. He stated, "I felt 
a sense of unity. All too often at 
Spring Hill we remain separated 
because of our group affiliation. 
This experience showed me that 
people can unite if they believe in a 
common cause." 

Several Students were fortunate 
enough to attend a speech by Df. 
Cornell Wess of Harvard Universi- 
ty. Ashley Monif was one of the 
lucky ones. He said, "Df. Wess' 
insights into black suffering are val- 
id and the illustration of how people 
identify themselves in a society by 
how that society regards the issue of 
death and the role of evil was supe- 
rior." 

While many students did not 
participate in the day's activities, 
those that did found the experience 
enlightening. 




V 'nee his candle is lit Patrick Davie 

passes the flame on to Ashley Monif at the 
start of the vigil on January 20. When 
every candle in the circle was lit, silence 
filled McLean Plaza as students and faculty 
alike honored the memory or Dr. Martin 
Luther King, Ir. 



22 STUDENT LIFE 




r. Timothy Carmody and Jaime 
O'Beirne wait in Lyons Park as instructions 

are given before the march in downtown 
Mobile. After being told where to line up, 
they, and the rest of the participants, 
gathered into the street to walk to Bishop 
State Community College. 



fore the vigil in MeLean Plaza, Jamila 
Smith hands out candles in the lobby of the 
Student Center to faculty members and 
students. Once everyone had received a 
candle, they formed a circle in the plaza tor 
he inspirational ceremony. 



esa Paille read aloud at the vigil on 
January 20, as television cameras gather 
around her. Following her words of honor 
for Dr. King, Father John Payne led those 
in attendance in a prayer. 



MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY 23 



Innkeepers. Lauren Hebcrt. Mike Gecto, 
Lee Ann Kincaid, and Tommy LMIo get 
inrii the parts fur their theme The Best 
Little Whorehouse in Texas in the 
Mardi Gras parade on Feb. I. When they 
stopped in front "f the nidges table, the 
riders put on their act with the best 
whooping and hollering they c 
summon. 




M 



nbers of Tri-Delta Sorority let 
everyone in the Cloister know that "Girl 
Just Want To Have Fun". The Karcokc 
Party on Jan. 30 allowed students to get 
into the wild anel crazy spirit of Mare" 
Gras. 



24 A PLACE TO GROW 



L 



A 



trip CO the zoo it is not. Parry-goers 
overcrowd one of the several buses usee! to 
chauffeur students to the Battleship Hanger 
for the Mardi Gras Ball on Jan 3 I 



A, 



Ifonso Cueto and Sarah Rives stare out 
in amazement after they are crowned king 
and queen of the Student Mystic Society at 
the coronation on Jan 29. They reigned 
over the Mardi Gras parade on Saturday, 
Feb. 1. 




:l the- Lionel runes roll! It was 
Mareli Gras again and |ust what 
Spring Hill students were waiting 
lor. The theme "Spring Hill College 
Takes Broadway" allowed everyone 
to get into the act. 

The week beg. in on Monday, 
fanuary 27, when students went to 
the polls to elect their Mardi Gras 
court. Kern Tedesco was one or the 
moderators at the booths. She said, 
"There seemed to be more people 
voting thrs year. Everyone apparent- 
ly weighed their choices well and 
took plenty or time ro vote. It was a 
hard decision, too, since voters 
could only choose five men and live- 
women instead of ten of each like 
last year." Voting lasted until the 
end ol dinner on Tuesday. 

Wednesday, the 29, gave ten 
male seniors and ten female seniors 
center stage at the coronation. They 
were the few chosen to serve on the 
court. The king was Alfonso Cueto 
and the queen, Sarah Rives. Alfonso 
felt overwhelmed when he heard his 
name. He said, "It was such a great 
honor to be chosen as king, but km 
really excited and having a lot of 
fun." Of course, there were also the 
four Grand Dukes: Chris Kramer, 
Doug Doyle, Ben Curtis, and Pat 



Halazyn; four Grand Duchesses: 
Stacy Akers, Lori Johnson, Me- 
lissa Gallagher, and Tracy Allu; 
and the rest ol the court: David 
Adams, Michael Brabner, Chad 
Frazier, |im Fry, Reid Gilbert, 
Sarah Bond, Pepper Cayer, 
Naralie Echeverria, Am)- Sensel, 
and Molly York that were an- 
nounced at the coronation by- 
Doctor |amcs Halncr, the 
Grand exhaulted Pooh Bah of 
the ceremony. 



Rock-N-Roll 



ALL NIGHT . . 
by Hope Lucas 



Nicole Harris attended the Kare- 
oke parry the following evening. 
She said, "The Kareoke was a really 
good idea. Ir was nice ro see every- 
one get up anel join in the en- 
tertainment." Nicole even played a 
part in the fun when she convinced 
Edgard Perez to join her in singing 
"I Want Your Sex". 



I he Kareoke Part)' on Jan. s(), gives 
Tony Simoncini a chance to impress the 
stuely body with his dancing skills. As "The 
F.leetrie Slide" played on, the line tor the 
dance floor grew. 




MARDI GRAS 25 



T 



his song seemed to be a theme 
song for some people. Carmen 
Montgomery found it to be hers at 
the Mardi Gras Ball at the Bat- 
tleship Hanger on Friday, January 
31. "I got to meet the band. Dr. 
Zarr's Amazing Funk Monster," 
stated Carmen, "and they dedicated 
"I Want Your Sex" to me. 1 was so 
surprised they picked that song, I 
couldn't believe it." 



. . .And Party 



EVERYDAY 
by Hope Lucas 



I hi Mu sorority members help their 
sisters make a lot a noise through clapping 
and singing for the judges in the Mardi 
Gras Parade on Feb. 1 . Their contribution 
surely aided as their theme "South Pacific" 
tied for first place. 



Leo Gilmore, as well, found the 
band to be the highlight of the 
evening. He stated, "They were a 
white-knuckle roller coaster ride of 
disco energy." Leo also liked the 
lighting in the hanger. 

Mardi Gras was nor complete 
without a parade. So, on Saturday 
afternoon, the court, students, fac- 
ulty, and Spring Hill community 
gathered and participated in a 



campus-wide parade. Shayla Barnes 
rode on the Alpha Kappa Alpha 
float dressed as Dorothy for their 
"Wizard of Oz" theme. From this 
vantage point, she saw the entire 
campus and said, "There didn't 
seem to be as many people from the 
community as last year, but overall 
it was a lot of fun." 

Al Gonzales did not get to partic- 
ipate in the parade. However, when 
the baseball team's scrimmage was 
over, he got to stand outside Walsh 
Hall, next to the judges, to watch it. 
Al said, "I caught so much stuff. 
The best, though, was watching all 
the people on the floats try to im- 
press the judges. Phi Mu was good, 
they were really loud." 

Following the parade, the rugby 
team played in a match. Spring Hill 
Mardi Gras' grand finale was a 
band party at the Lumberyard. 
"The Grapes" and "Secondhand 
Jive" performed. Here, the an- 
nouncement of the best floats was 
made. First place was a tie between 
Phi Mu's "South Pacific" and Delta 
Delta Delta's "Singing In the 
Rain". 

Spring Hill Mardi Gras was not 
to be upstaged. It gave everyone a 
moment in the spotlight to sing, 
dance, parade, and overall shine. 



I at Halaszyn, Amber Greenwell, and 
Mary Ann Rousso take a break from the 
dance floor on Jan 3 1 ■ They still had a 
hard time sitting back for a chat as they 
had to yell over "Dr. Zarr's Amazing Funk 
Monster" to hear one another at the Ball. 



B f 



'renden Sprague is going for mosr 
unique outfit at the Mardi gras Ball on Jan. 
3 1 . However, he got no strange looks when 
he choose Kelly Miears as a dance partner. 



T 



he Accounting Club was a loud crowd 
in their authentic Mardi Gras costumes. 
Their float in the patade won them third 
place. 




26 A PLACE TO GROW 



erri Tedesco shows everyone how it is 
done. When the band took a break. Ken 
was one or die many students on Jan. 3 1. 
in the Battleship Hanger to do the 
Macarena". 




tike Ben Curtis and Duchess Melissa 
Gallagher chunk out plenty of throws in 
the Mardi Gras parade on Feb. 1. Even 
when Ben had a little trouble untangling 
the beads, Melissa continued to give the 
crowd what they wanted, more throws. 



MARDI GRAS 27 



c 




I t's not a club, not an 

organization, not an academic, and 
definitely not a sport. Campus 
Ministry is more or an essence of 
Spring Hill. It inhibits and 



A Question 



OF FAITH 
by Hope Lucas 



enhances the entire atmosphere of 
SHC. 

Much of Campus Ministry's ac- 
tivities take place off campus, in the 
form of retreats. The SHAPe 
(Spring Hill Awakening Peer) Re- 
treat and the Ignation Retreats arc- 
some of these. Emery DeSonier at- 
tended the first Ignation Retreat 
and found it to be, "A great time to 
reflect and get my priorities straight 
before school really got under way.'' 

Seth Bilellio also attended the 
retreat and said, "It helped me chill 
out and get a real view of things. 



It's something everyone at a Jesuit 
school needs to do. I loved it.' 

Some students found the retreats 
so enjoyable that they went to more 
than one. Dan Liana was one such 
person. He stated, "Ignation is a 
nice weekend to get away from the 
hectic weekdays of school." 

The Campus Ministry division 
was not .ill retreats though. It got 
students involved in the community 
through Urban Immersion and 
Christmas on the Hill. While the 
entire campus was able to help with 
Christmas on the Hill, Urban Im- 
mersion involved only some stu- 
dents. Maria Walley found Urban 
Immersion to be a valuable expeti- 
ence. "I helped out at the Water- 
front Rescue Mission and some- 
weekends served spaghetti to 
L'Arche members." 

Campus Ministry is also a major 
part of the regular liturgies on cam- 
pus. These are provided for stu- 
dents, faculty, and all of the Spring, 
Hill community. 

In the end, it is hard to pin down 
the actual area that Campus Minis- 
try falls into, but there is no ques- 
tion that it affects the spiritual side 
of the Spring Hill campus lifestyle. 



-ynthia Miller, Daphne- Childress, Jessica 
Starr, and Emery DeSonier find chat they 
have a little bit i)t time to talk with one 
another at Ignation Rerreat 1. Therefore, 
they spent their coffee time chatting with 
one another. 



■I mm Jan. <i - 10, students participate in 
a five-day Ignation Retreat. Scott Salathe, 
Franeois Cady, M.J. Knoble, and Melvin 
Crump went to Oak Grove tor the 

extended retreat, accompanied by Father 
Robert Rimes. 




/Vs [^nation Retreat II is a spiritual 
experience, students spend some time in 
group prayer. With hands clasped George 
Alexander, Katie Joyce, Mike Scheldt, 
David Hughes, Mike McCann, and Christie 
Disser lowered their heads tor this 
experience. 



28 A PLACE TO GROW 







treats give those in attendance a time 
to get to know themselves as well as each 
other. The first Ignation Retreat on Oct. 18 
- 20 allowed Chad Frazier, Father John 
Payne, and Eddie Tnnmons this chance. 



_T 



he student led SHAPe Retreat includes 
a mass tor all in attendance. Clay Cozart, 
Miryam Rubin, Ginger Brodtman, Mandy 
Brodtman, Lauren Hebert, Mary iVlungcr, 
Katie Yester, Michelle Gormanous, Jim 
Fry, Nancy Miller, Susanne Jersa, Kelly 
Doherty, and Doug Doyle waited silently 
for mass to begin. 



CAMPUS MINISTRY 29 



M 



any mothers found May 
1 1th to be one of the best Mother's 
Days they could ever have. These 
were the mothers ot Spring Hill 
College's 1997 Graduating Class. 



Graduation 

AT LAST 
by Hope Lucas 



It was a perfect day for a gradua- 
tion, too. Fortunately, the graduates 
got to proceed down the Avenue of 
the Oaks to receive their diplomas 
just as their predecessors had done. 
The rain plan was for them to grad- 
uate in the new Recreation Center. 




A, 



kfter four years of hard work, Leo 
Gilmore takes some time to relax before he 
graduates on May 1 1 . Those few minutes 
were die last ones that Leo spent in the 
Library as a student. 



c, 



-hris Kramer speaks to the graduation 
class as Senior Class Orator. Not only was 
Chris elected by the seniors to address 
them, but they chose him twice. 



Lucky for them, it actually did not 
rain in Mobile. 

After a welcome by Dr. Kenneth 
Hamilton and award presentations, 
three deserving individuals received 
honorary degrees. They were Harp- 
er Lee, Most Reverend Oscar Lip- 
scomb, and Colman McCarthy. 
Next came the big event: the con- 
ferring of degrees. The degrees were 
as follows: two Master of Arts, 24 
Master of Arts in Teaching, 23 
Master ot Business Administration, 
seven Master of Liberal Arts, 3 1 
Master of Science, nine Masrer of 
Theological Studies, 86 Bachelor of 
Arts, 128 Bachelor of Science, and 
tour Associate ot Science. It was a 
proud day for mothers. 

Chris Kramer gave the Address 
by the Senior Class Oratot, as he- 
was elected, twice, to do so. Follow- 
ing the remarks and benediction, 
the graduates retired most joyously. 



A, 



kuthor Harper Lee is bestowed the 
honorary degree of Doctot of Humane 
Letters by Dr. Margaret Davis, aided by 
Father William Rewak. Ms. Lee was 
honored for her novel, Tn Kill A 
Mockingbird. 



I r is a happy day tor Sarah Esslinger on 
May 1 1 . She was prsented with a Bachelor 
of Science degree by Father William 
Rewak. 




30 A TIME TO GROW 



/Archbishop of Mobile, Oscar Lipscomb 
gives his remarks ro the graduates in 
attendance. Earlier in the ceremony, he had 
received the Honorable Degree of Doctor of 
Sacred Theology. 




GRADUATION 31 




i| unuiiimin 







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ei 


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Jyitt ' W " |i "- ■ 










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ttisiF*> r*m 


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: . »/: S ^ 




m <—-<»««»MMt 







; : ; .: ; : : 



















in 



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Tfie Class of 1997 



A 





otes 




tudents, during the 
beginning of their college 
career, want to belong. 
Clubs help them to do 
this. Joining a club helps 
students to make more 
friends, help others, lets 
them branch out, and 

PLACE 

hopefully helps to make 
college a more enjoyable 
experience. Some of the 
clubs, especially Greeks, 
can even be part of your 
life after graduation. If 
you want to expand your 
horizons, a club is a per- 
fect place to begin. 

TO BELONG 



junt Vernon, Alabama, is where Tom 
Brogan, and Cedric Fernandas, are rarget 
practicing. They are shooting two MAK 
90s. Members of the Outdoors club can 
opt to participate in this activity. 



V 

K eating their lines for the play, Arcadia, 
are Owen Lyons and Lee Ann Kincaid. 
Arcadia was performed in the spring in the 
newly constructed Arlene Mitchell Theatre. 




34 A PLACE TO GROW 




A PLACE TO BELONG 35 



TRAINING 

TO BE 
PROFESSIONAL 



One day the students that are in the nursing program will be nurses themselves, 
maybe even in well-known hospitals. To help them along their way, nurses can join 
the Student Nursing Association. In the S.N. A. Dr. Henderson helps the students 
become more familiar with procedures. At the Health Fair "nursing students practice 
their skills in taking blood pressure, and other vital signs," said Cedric Fernandes. 
Fernandes also said, "It is a great way to learn the tools of the trade and become more 
adept at using them." 

So if you are a nursing student and want to become more involved in the program 
and become more familiar with the profession in general, think of getting involved in 
the Student Nursing association. 



Officers of Student Nursing Association 
from left to right: Kim Lou, Norman 
Moore, Ben Baker, Anjanette Leblanc, 
and Elise Seymour 





Touring Spring Hill Memorial Hospital are 
Aerin Gombos, and Cedric Fernandes. 
"The nursing classes toured metro Mobili- 
an hospitals to find out what it would be 
like for them when they began to work in 
hospitals, " said Cedric Fernandes. 




36 A PLACE TO GROW 




Blood testing for iron at the Health Fair 
are Will Hughes, Matt Carpenter, and 
Mike Vondernstein. Watching over them is 
a U.S.A. medical representative. The fair 
occured in March and was held in the 

Cafeteria, photo by Dr. Henderson 



Checking for vital signs, including blood 
pressure at the Health Fair are Jason Alise, 
and Mike Vondernstein. photo by Dr, Haulenm 



STUDENT NURSING ASSOCIATION 37 



HOBBIE 

WITH 




FLARE 



Does a trip to the Bahamas sound exotic to you? Well the Outdoors Club 
managed to come up with enough money by having car washes among other 
things, to have some of their club members take that trip. 

Beginning a club all by yourself is hard work. Richard Foote president of the 
club said, "this year was our first year on campus and eventually we were able to 
get a room for all of our equipment, it took some negotiating though." Cedric 
Fernandes added, "We also provide equipment for a small fee for the various 
school organizations. For example Tri Delta and Circle K used our camping 
equipment. 

The Troubadors are a moving company. They "perform a dramatic version of 
the Passion Play during the Easter Season," states Stephen Sparks. Performing 
at local parishes was also something they enjoyed doing. Beginning next year 
they will do road trips. The club is affiliated with Campus Ministry under the 
direction of Richard Lee. 

Artists who wanted to get together joined the Student Art League. They went 
to galleries and watched some informational videos on art, among other things. 

So if you are interested in joining a club, keep the ones mentioned above in 
mind. 



The Outdoors Club 
Back Row: Stephen Sparks, Jo- 
seph Reeves, Stephanie Moran, 
Richard Foote, Tom Brogan, and 
William Healy. 

Middle Row: Jennifer Dodd, 
Kendal Balkom, Kari Alexander, 
and Heather Wolford 
Front Row: Cedric Fernandes, 
Suzanne Roberts, and Penny 
Schuessler. 

Not Pictured: Shivonne Edwards 
and Terry Hillery. 




Checking for the last time before they 
enter the trail of vehicles for the Mardi 
Gras Parade are Stephanie Moran, Joseph 
Reeves, and Stephen Sparks. They along 
with all of the other clubs, who had en- 
tered the parade, were waiting in the Plant 
Services parking lot, February 1. Joseph 
Reeves stated that "we stayed up all night 
following the Mardi Gras Dance to work 
on this, we were exhausted, but it was 
worth it." 













38 A PLACE TO GROW 




Richard Foote raises "The Jolly Roger" 
flag for the Outdoors club's sailing excur- 
sion. A few members of the club went out 
into Mobile Bay in March on a 30ft Island- 
er named Senoj, which is owned by Bill 

Healy.. photo b\j Cedric Fernandes 



The Troubadours shown here in costume 
for the Passion play are composed of, 
Stephen Sparks, Eric Eide, Margarete 
Finzel, Megan Smith, Marianne Russo, 
Terry Meilleur, Matt Carpenter, and 

Becky Reed, photo by Richard Lee 



OUTDOORS, STUDENT ART LEAGUE, TROUBADOURS 39 



THE ONLY 

CONTACT 
SPORT 



The rugby club is not a Spring Hill College sport. This does not deter students who want 
to play rugby though. The members have been very successful in putting together a team 
every year. The team practices twice a week, and their games are on Saturdays. It is the 
only contact sport on campus. 






Bach Row: Bo Randol, Pat Mitchell, Peter 
Chance, Ben Curtis, Nick DeVito, Tom 
Lehman, Andy Koch, Aeron Sestrian, 
John Travers, Rob Power, Duffy Higgins, 
Christian Chomant, James Devaney, Matt 
Green, Tevis Vandergriff and Steve Caru- 
so. 

Front Row: Andy Copote, Melvin Crump, 
BJ Barrios, Aeron Rives, Meal Daddy, 
John McCormick, Cal Elcan, and Brad 
Dean. 



About to tackle a SLU player is Melvin 
Crump, while teammate Aeron Reeves co- 
mes to support. The game took place on 
Library Field. 




40 A PLACE TO GROW 




In the midst of a line up is Ben Curtis, 
catching the ball, while Nick DeVito comes 
to help. 



Cal Elcan is about to tackle a Tulane rugby 
player, while Tevis Vandergriff and Tom 
Lehman are there to help Cal bring him 
down. The game was at home on Library 
Field. 






RUGBY CLUB 41 



KNIGHTa 

OF 
COLUMBU 



The purpose of the Knights of Columbus is to create better Christian men and women of 
Spring Hill College and foster unity among them. 





Knights of Columbus held their annual 
Beignet Breakfast during the alumni week- 
end in April. John Steen rolls out the 
dough for the beignets. 



Cooking the beignets at the Beignet Break- 
fast held Alumni weekend, is Sean 
Hengesbach. Mike Bartholomy, while 
waiting for the beignets, prepares the next 
batch. 



$P&$ipWR$ff<w 




42 A PLACE TO GROW 




At the Knights of Columbus Beignet 
Breakfast during Alumni weekend are 
John Steen, Jeff Salsiccia, Mike Bartholo- 
my, Corey Oubre, and Sean Hengesbach. 




KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS 
Front Row: James DeVaney, Sam Di Be 
nedetto, John Steen, and Joe Morris. 
Back Row: Sean Hengesbach, Mike 
Bartholomy, and Jeff Salsiccia. 



RINIGHTS OF COLUMBUS 43 



KNOWING 

ABOUT 
HEALTH 



AIDS, suicide, health. 
These are just some of the 
topics that the students in 
the Working on Wellness 
Club (W.O.W.) and the 
Peer Educators cover. The 
main difference between 
W.O.W. and the Peer 
Educators is that W.O.W. 
is for the whole campus. 
The Peer Educators, on the 
other hand, practice target 
education, by visiting 
residence halls and 
discussing various topics 
with the different wings. 
Erin Russell president of 
both clubs, said that "For 
the most part students in 
the nursing courses and 



medical fields in general are 
the people who make up 
most of the clubs. This is 
because it looks good on 
your resume, is very 
informational, and offers 
good experience. This does 
not mean that just people 
who are interested in the 
medical field can join. Any- 
one who is interested can." 

The aim of both organiza- 
tions is "to make people 
aware that they need to be 
healthy " says Russell. In 
order to achieve this goal, 
W.O.W sponsors events like 
Aids Day, and The Great 
American Smokeout. 

Russell was also proud of 



the fact that W.O.W had 
received the award for Best 
Club on Campus for the last 
two years, from Student 
Government Association 
(S.G.A.). The award is given 
to the club that does the 
most for the campus, as far 
as getting people involved. 



Playing Twister at The Great American 
Smokeout are Miryam Rubio, Morgan 
Chiapella, and Karen Trujillo. The event was 
sponsored by W.O.W. 









44 A PLACE TO GROW 




WORKING ON WELLNESS, PEER EDUCATORS 45 




ERVICE 



WITH A 
SMILE 



It's really, really not a convience store. Circle K is a community service based club. It is 
sponsored by a local chapter of Kiwanis, in this case, Azalea City Kiwanis. The three main 
goals of Cirlce K are simple: Service, Leadership, and Fellowship. Spring Hill's branch of 
this organization met these goals. 

Members of Circle K found themselves at Penelope House, a shelter for battered women 
and children, weekly. There they watched, played, and taught the children while the 
mothers were in counseling. Also, members organized a Pantry Raid for Penelope House 
to get local neighborhoods to donate non-perishable items to the shelter. In the spring, 
Circle K camped in Gulf Shores and helped landscape Zooland. 

Leadership was not a hard requirement to fill. The members of Circle K elected an 
Executive Board. They consisted of Leigh Ellen Hall, President; Heather Bell, Vice- 
president; Hope Lucas, Secretary; and Lynsey Lobb, Treasurer. As well, International 
Trustee, Ben Goldman was a member. 

Service and Leadership are all fine and dandy, but the members had the most fun in the 
Fellowship department. They had ice cream, pizza, and other types of socials. The most 
fun, though, was the "One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish" party that they threw 
during orientation, complete with a band and real fish. 

Circle K may not have been one of the largest groups on campus, but they made their 
presence known on campus and in the community. 



While not neglecting their food, Megan 
Smith, Mimi Finzel, and Laura Dicas listen 
intently to Leigh Ellen Hall. The pizza 
social in Fairway Apartment 307 was just 
one of the many Circle K socials. 




It is a hunt for a good cause as Maria 
Walley and Lynsey Lobb shop at Baby 
Superstore for items for Penelope House. 
The scavenger hunt was part of the service 
project for the Membership Education Ral- 
ly for the Alabama District, hosted by 
Spring Hill Circle K. 




in 

'IB 



m.M - 



3 M 




46 A PLACE TO GROW 




In recognition of Ben Goldman's election 
as International Trustee, Dean of Students, 
Joe Niland, presents Ben with a patch for 
the club banner and many words of con- 
gratulations. 



Circle K members Megan Smith, Laura 
Dicas, Mimi Finzel, Ben Golddman, and 
Leigh Ellen Hall along with guest Michelle 
Gormanous, go outdoors for some cam- 
ping in Gulf Shores. After a night of 
s'mores, they were ready to get to work at 
Zooland, landscaping the zoo. 



CIRCLE K 47 



HELPING 

THE 

COMMUNITY 



Tri Delta is not just an on-campus organization. The members went to the Saturn 
dealership to help them raise money for St. Judes. Members also participated in the Breast 
Cancer Walk and were the largest organization in attendance. 

Along with helping with the community, "Tri Delta's philanthropy is St. Judes, which is 
for children with cancer" said Jennifer Delcambre. In order to raise money for their 
philanthropy Kendal Balkom said "we have an 80's party, where all proceeds go to St. 
Judes." 

"The highlight of the year came at the end," Cynthia Miller said, "the President of 
every Tri Delta chapter came to visit. Gwynn Wynn had heard about us from the area 
representatives, about how great we were. She was vacationing at Gulf Shores at the time 
and decided to pop in for a visit." 





r 




Caught up in the excitement of Bid 
Night is MaryAnn Haggerty, Mary 
Munger, Renee Hinton, Melissa Gal- 
lagher, and Sarah Reeves. Munger 
along with 54 other rushees were cal- 
led down one at a time to accept their 
bid. Once Munger had accepted her 
bid for Tri Delta. She was propelled 
down the stairs of the Louise Moore 
Commons out into the waiting crowd. 
Bid night was January 12. 



Caught up in the excitement of Derby 
Days were the Tri Delta pledges. The 
theme for Sigma Chi's Derby Days was 
Star Wars. Each group who participated in 
Derby Days performed in the skit contest. 
Phi Mu won, and Tri Delta came second. 
Performing are: Holly Yots, Monique 
Sommer, Aerin Gombos, Mary Munger, 
Lauren Moore, Rebecca Kibbe, Mandy 
Brodtman, Ellen Fulgham, Nichole Beers, 
Tracey, Beth Ingersol, Shivonne Edwards, 
and Maggie Tsaltas. 








48 A PLACE TO GROW 




Posing with the National President of Tri 
Delta are Gwynn Wynn (the national presi- 
dent), and Cynthia Miller. Wynn came 
down during Tri Delta senior week in May. 

photo fay Nancy Miller 



Delta Delta Delta members posing at 
Stuartfield at Sigma Chi Derby Days. The 
event took place in March. Members of 
each team signed up to be in a specific 
event, ranging from the tricycle race, to 
the egg throwing contest, and mud volley- 
ball. 



DELTA DELTA DELTA 49 



TEN 

YEAR 
ANNIVERSARY 

The Phi Mu's celebrated their ten year anniversary on Spring Hill's Campus. The 
members invited Phi Mu alumni to their celebration. Susie Saint said, "it was a lot of fun 
and we had a good turnout. Even though I was a new initiate, it was nice to see old 
members of the sorority. We had a tea at Stuartfield and then we went to Monsoon's." 

Other than celebrating their anniversary, Phi Mu members also did charitable work. 
Their philanthropy is the Children's Miracle Network, and at one point they sold paper 
balloons outside the cafeteria and the proceeds went to the Network. As well as selling 
balloons they also participated in a Rock-A-Thon to raise money. 

Not only is Phi Mu the only chapter to have a sister sorority in Mobile, they also are the 
only sorority on campus to have two mascots. The lion is the National mascot, whereas the 
cow was adopted specifically for this chapter. 

Overall the year sped by very fast. Amy Gorum said, "Rush wasn't even all that 
stressful, going through it for the first time, the only downside was that it was time 
consuming, but I got to meet a lot of people and I had fun." 



Leaving the Plant Services parking lot aloft 
their float are Phi Mu actives. The Phi 
Mu's decided to have two floats, one with 
active members, the second with new ini- 
tiates. The actives wore luau gear and the 
initiates wore sailor costumes, in keeping 
with their South Pacific theme. 





*"*t| ¥ 



ml 



Driving past Walsh is the first Phi Mu 
float with the new initiates on board. The 
Mardi Gras Parade allowed for the 
community to come and join in the fun 
and catch beads and other assorted items 
being thrown off floats. 







50 A PLACE TO GROW 




Bursting with excitement is Susie Saint as 
she is escorted out the doors into her 
awaiting sorority sisters arms. Saint ac- 
cepted her bid for Phi Mu 

Even after blowing Lip .ill those balloons 
Anjanette LeBIanc is able to otter .1 smile 
The balloons were tor one of Phi Mu's rush 
party. 



PHI Ml) 51 



LAMBDA 





Lambda Chi Alpha members philanthropy is the North American Food Drive. To help 
this organization the Lambda Chi members, Kevin Morris said "Do a Pantry Raid where 
we put bags on doors, and get people to donate canned food and other such necessities." 

As well as the North American Food Drive, the Lambda Chi's do community service 
work at the Boys and Girls Club of Mobile. Watermelon Bust was held for them. 

Morris also said, "We received two awards. The organization with the highest GPA, and 
the organization with the most campus involvement." 

Lambda Chi Alpha's heritage is based on human vision, need, understanding, idealism 
and love. And above all, it is built on a series of honest friendships. 





At the Lambda Chi party in January are: 
Sarah Fruin. Tom Lane, Jennifer Hartrich, 
Theresa Bueche, Byron Patareau, Jennifer 
Delcambre, Linda Garcia, Dolly Flisk, 
Daphne Childress, Emily Stevens, Chris- 
tina Smith, and Clay Cozart. 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA members at the 
President's House. 



A>A. 



52 A PLACE TO GROW 




Lambda Chi after doing their pantry raid. 
Posing are: Byron Patoreau, Kevin Rys, 
Scott Salathe, Brad Usher, David Angeli- 
na, Chad Callahan, and David Shaffer. 



At the Watermelon Bust in September, 
Ash Montif valiantly tries to catch the 
watermelon as it gets thrown through the 
air. 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 53 



INVOLVED 

IN 

ACAXDEMICS 

Many other organizations are on Spring Hill College's 
Campus. They may be small but they are not forgotten. 
While not included on a page of their own, they do deserve 
recognition. 

ACCOUNTING CLUB 

Its purpose is to unite those students who study accounting 
and to promote education, community service and profes^ 
sional development among these students. 

AD CLUB 

Its purpose is to enhance the education and knowledge oi 
students in the field of advertising. 

THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 

Its purpose is to foster pride in the profession of chemistry 
among chemistry majors. 

ENGLISH CLUB 

Its purpose is to advance the education and interest of thoss 
enrolled as English majors or those interested in English. 



54 A PLACE TO GROW 



,tvr 








a Outdoors club at Paintball USA in Taking bids on Frank Butterfield, is Robbie 
'bile: Brian Geislinger, Mike Ory, Pat- Robichaux. The bidding took place in the 
( Goff, Tom Brogan, Owen Lyons, Grill Room for Sigma Chi Derby Days, 
hard Foote, Bill Healy, and Cedric Fer- 
ides. 



ACCOUNTING CLUB, AD CLUB, 55 
THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, ENGLISH CLUB 



FOCUSED 

on 

ACADEMICS 



Many other organizations are on Spring Hill College's cam 
pus. They may be small but they are not forgotten, While no 
included in a page of their own, they do deserve recognition 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLUB 

Its purpose is to further the interest of students in foreigr 
language and culture through meetings and various activities 

GLOBAL AFFAIRS CLUB 

Its purpose is to promote interest in and understanding o 
international issues, and to publish the bi-annual studem 
publication, "Spring Hill Journal of Global Affairs." 

HISTORY CLUB 

Its purpose is to advance the education and interests of thos( 
enrolled as history majors or those interested in history. 

PHILOSOPHY CLUB I 

Its purpose is to enhance and broaden the education anc 
interests of students interested in philosophy. 



56 A PLACE TO GROW 




lleyball with a twist. ..in the mud. Sigma Working on decorations in preparation for 

i hosted Derby Days in March, and one parent's weekend Jamaican Me Crazy par- 

the events is tournament style mud ty are: Marisa Theriot, Adrienne Dixon, 

leyball. Christina Smith, Emily Stevens, and Jennifer Scalici. The event is held 

y Wilson, and M.J. Knoble, part of the annually every October. 

Delta team had a fun time frolicking in 
! mud. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLUB, GLOBAL AFFAIRS CLUB 57 
HISTORY CLUB, PHILOSOPHY CLUB 



INTERESTED 

IN > 

ACADEMICS I 

Many other organizations are on Spring Hill College's cam 
pus. They may be small but they are not forgotten. While not 
included in a page of their own, they do deserve recognition.! 



POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB 

Its purpose is to develop and promote interest in local, national and internationa 
politics. The club sends delegates to Model United Nations sessions conducted b\, 
area universities and hosts social meetings for faculty and students as well as 
sponsors guest speakers. 

SCIENCE CLUB 

Its purpose is to publish "The Mobius Strip": Dedicated to the Continuous 
Evolution of Knowledge in Science; to give students of the natural and physica 
sciences, as well as of math and computer science, an outlet for accomplishments 
in their field; to expose students to the valuable work being done by their peers 
and to promote a greater campus-wide interest in the sciences. 

S.H.O.R.E.S. 

The purpose of the Spring Hill Ocean Research and Exploration Society is 
dedicated to the exploration, preservation and research of gulf marine ecology. 

STUDENTS IN FREE ENTERPRISE 

Its purpose is to promote an understanding of economics and an appreciation foi 
the free enterprise system. 



58 A PLACE TO GROW 



t 

i ... 




Phi Kappa Tau's posing on their float In order to show their support, members 
ng the Mardi Gras Parade. of the sponsoring Kiwanis Club, Azalea 

City, held a bar-be-que for the Alabama 
District Membership Education Rally with 
the help of Spring Hill Circle K members. 
The workers were: Ted Autterson, Dr. 
Maureen Beanan, Heather Bell, Leigh El- 
len Hall, Maria Walley, Lindy Kaiser, Lyn- 
sey Lobb, and Laura Dicas. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB, SCIENCE CLUB, S.H.O.R.E.S. 59 

STUDENTS IN FREE ENTERPRISE 



ABOVE 



AND 
BEYOND 

Many other organizations are on Spring Hill College's cam 
pus. They may be small but they are not forgotten. While no 
included in a page of their own, they do deserve recognition 



ALPHA SIGMA NU 

Its purpose is to honor those students who have showr 
themselves to be outstanding examples of ideals of Jesui 
education and to foster and contribute to the intellectual anc 
cultural life of the campus. 

OMICRON DELTA EPSILON 

Its purpose is to provide access to the international hono: 
society in economics to encourage and recognize high ac 
ademic achievement in the study of economics. 

PHI ALPHA THETA 

Its purpose is to provide an international honor fraternity ir 
history to honor and encourage achievement in the field o: 
history. 

PHI ETA SIGMA 

Its purpose is to promote, encourage, and recognize academ 
ic excellence among freshmen. 



60 A PLACE TO GROW 




'■ 






% ■ &^>™ ',■■■■■ M$ 





■k.^L IMP lHH 






<ing sure the Phi Mu float does not Jamila Smith and Tonya Edwards, Alpha 
le undone is Beth Ann Bigley. Phi Mu's Kappa Alpha members, gather to plan 
tie was South Pacific. The floats gath- rush. 
J in the Plant Services parking lot, 
are taking their tour around the cam- 



ALPHA SIGMA NU, OMICROIN DELTA EPSILON, 61 
PHI ALPHA THETA, PHI ETA SIGMA 



AM 



HONORABLE 
PURSUIT 

Many other organizations are on Spring Hill College's 
campus. They may be small but they are not forgotten. 
While not included in a page of their own, they do deserve 
recognition. j 

PHI SIGMA ALPHA 

The purpose of the National Political Science Honor Societv 
is to recognize high standards of scholarship and academic 
distinction both in political science and in the sum total o 
academic work. Honorary memberships are voted by Iota Ps 
Chapter members to "distinguish persons who have mad< 
valuable contributions to political science or government." 

PSI CHI 

Its purpose is to provide access to a national psychology 
honorary for undergraduate and graduate students to pro 
mote academic excellence in and professional enthusiasm foi 
the field of psychology. 

SIGMA TAU DELTA 

The purpose of the National English Honor Society is tc 
confer distinction for high achievement in undergraduate anc 
professional studies in English language and literature. 



62 A PLACE TO GROW 




lels at the mother daughter Panhellen- 
ea for parent's weekend are: from left 
ight: Amy DiPazza, Katie Berg, Erin 
'er, Jessica Starr, Anjanette LeBlanc, 
i Radulski, Marie Forsdick, Ely Comer- 
Amy Gonzalez, Lara Goeke, Valerie 
f, and Shawna Salmon. 



Sigma Tau Delta members 
Back Row: Jennifer Surline, Joyce Shehee, 
Kelly Manwaring, Nancy Rafter, and 
Monique Curet. 

Front Row: Ben Goldman, Kelly Miears, 
Margaret McDowell, Julia Landi, and Mag- 
gie Fernandes. 



PHI SIGMA ALPHA, PSI CHI, SIGMA TAU DELTA 63 



INVOLVED 

ON 
CAMPUS 

Many other organizations are on Spring Hill College's cam 
pus. They may be small but they are not forgotten. While no 
included in a page of their own, they do deserve recognition 

BUSINESS AND INVESTING CLUB 

Its purpose is to further a better understanding of th« 
business and financial markets. 

MOBILE CLUB 

Its purpose is to provide activities and facilities which encour 
age students of the Mobile community to become involved h 
campus life. 



SPRINGHILLIANS 

Their purpose is to promote Spring Hill and assist th< 
Admissions Office in recruiting and hosting prospective nev 
students to Spring Hill College. ] 

MULTICULTURAL STUDENT UNION 

Its purpose is to increase diversity on campus, encourage 
multicultural student participation in college life and to foste 
and contribute to the intellectual and cultural life on campus 



64 A PLACE TO GROW 




le American Student Nursing Associa- 
Convention in February are Richard 
i, Norman Moore, and Dr. Henderson. 



Karla Mitchell, Shayla Barnes, and Jamila 
Smith pose inside the Cloister where the 
AKA Valentines Day Auction took place. 



BUSINESS AND INVESTING CLUB, MOBILE CLUB 
SPRINGHILLIANS, MULTICULTURAL STUDENT UNION 



65 



SPEAKING 



OUT OH 
CAMPU 

Many other organizations are on Spring Hill College's carr 
pus. They may be small but they are not forgotten. While no 
included in a page of their own, they do deserve recognition 



COFFEE HOUSE 

Its purpose is to give all members of the SHC community 
chance to perform. Coffee House is an opportunity fo 
people to gather in an atmosphere which promotes irt 
tellectual, spiritual, social, and moral growth. 

COLLEGE REPUBLICANS 

Its purpose is to promote and encourage the interests of th 
Republican Party among students and serve as a liaisoi 
organization between students and the national, state an« 
local Republican Party. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS COUNCIL OF ALABAMA 

The purpose of Spring Hill's PRCA student chapter is t 
affiliate students with the state-wide professional orgar 
ization and to provide educational opportunities througl 
exposure to public relations professionals, publications, serr 
inars and awards programs. 



66 A PLACE TO GROW 




e Rugby Club members relaxing after 
-Trent's Weekend game. Back Row: 
-'helan, Tom Lehman, John T ravers, 
t Row: John McClughlan, John Me- 
rrick, and Andy Koch. The team beat 
ne 24-20. 



Carving out watermelons at Stuartfield for 
the Lambda Chi Alpha Watermelon Bust 
are, Chad Callahan, and Kevin Morris. 
The event took place in September. 



COFFEE HOUSE. COLLEGE REPUBLICANS, PRCA 87 



Ih Students ok Spuing <M Gofege 

would fe io dedicate, tdese, iwo pages in 

^ewio/iy o(y Paafa <tiavufeoi/i 



"Sde, was ml) best jj/iiend 
and Mlj inspiration. <Uel 

kuqjL could afWacjs b/ugfeen 
anyone's fejje. Sfe was ik. 

Strongest person T eDeJi wet" 
QemL Linton 




Paula Hamilton and Renee Hinton. 



"Voda was a hxo to wiany 

n 11 




JofWie. <tiamifeon, Pauda's 

fyatRe/i 



68 A PLACE TO GROW 



'Vain was amazing 
&ause ettw tRougR sRe was 
10 side, sRe neiM kt it get 
to Reii, sRe feept jjtQfaing. 

'cdta was afWays mejie jjoil 

ex {y/iiends eUei tRougR sRe 

was tRe one, wRo needed. 

Soweone. tReiie |jO/l ReJi." 

JeKRifjeiL G/LQngeJi 




Paula, her Freshman year. 




Paula in November of 1994. 



PAULA HAMILTON 69 




t 



He, Siuobcts o\j Spuing <Ni?£ Go 
\uaid fe to dedicate tdese to pages to 

iit wiemoWj o\j Jom.es T)ey\fom^ 



" Jaw.es afiways tofld we to 

{yodHow wy ReO/it and Jiewiain 

iWJie to wi) {yjuends. JoM.es 

was a a/ieat in{y(!uenCe on 

anyone Re COwie in Contact 

wrtR, not just tRose tRat weAe 

cfose to Ris kosit!' 

Lena "Kttaunt 





James DeVaney anil Lena Blount their sopl 
omore year at the Mardi Gras Ball. 



James and Brad Dean participating in tl 
HOSTS program. 



70 A PLACE TO GROW 



T lad tRe piuu-ekdge ofr fenowing JcM.es> 

since we weie botR {j-iiesRmen in RigR scRood 

OlteJi iRe yeo/ts we become clbseJi Qnd 

cfosen. Last yeai we became cfiosei tRan 

elte/i, being JioommOtes in Mobile <Haf£ 

James ConDinCed me to attend Spuing <Ni 

n tRe summen o{y 1906. During tRe time we 

fited togetRe/i, I was abde to (learn tRings 

about J(M.e2, most people didn't. midmost 

elteJiL) nigRt we woudd keep owisel!aes up 

tiding to {yiguuie out tRe meaning o{y tRis 

StfiOnge woflHd we fc^ed in. Knowing James, 

Re p/iobabdt) fjiguied it out. I freed, I know 

James in a way most people didn't and I 

nM COUiy tRat witR me (jo/i tRe /test oft my 

ijje. SlteliytRing James eDeA said to me wi& 

S Jiemain a part ojj- me and tReJie wid 

s be a big peat ofr my Reo/rt (yon 
James." 
TSW Raggett 





lames prepares for a game of Rugby while a 
■ophomore 




JAMES DEVANEY 71 




Sports 




A 

Clh, the thrill of compe- 
tition. It is the pain, the 
struggle, and especially 
the victory that make 
participating in sports so 
popular. Everything 
from basketball to golf is 
available for 

PLACE 



T 

I earn Captain, Zion Woolridge pitches 
one of his strike out balls for the baseball 
team. Zion was also the first string pitche 



SvA 



hile A member of Loyola's women 
basketball team tries to block her, Jill 
Mathias successfully passes the ball. The 
Lady Badgers went on to win the game 9 
72 on January 16. 




students. They even had 
their choice of intramural 
athletics. So, while all 
the sports were different _ 

in their playing fields, re s P u i j 
scoring, and team make- 
up, they all offered the 
same thing: a chance to 
run and play. 

TO RUM & PLAY 



72 A PLACE TO GROW 





Y 



H 



,-Mf 




'm «* J 






:r"g s s« 






A PLACE TO RUN & PLAY 73 



B 
A 
S 
K 
E 
T 
B 
A 
L 
L 



Scoreboard 



Date 

10/30 

11/2 

11/6 

11/9 

11/22 

11/23 

11/26 

12/5 

12/17 

1/3 

1/9 

1/11 

1/13 

1/16 

1/18 

1/23 

1/25 

1/27 

1/30 

2/1 

2/7 

2/8 

2/13 

2/15 

2/17 

2/20 

2/26 

3/1 

3/6 

3/7 

3/8 



MEN'S BASKETBALL 

Opponet 

Concordia 

AUM 

Concordia 

AUM 

Incarnate Word 

St. Mary 

Life 
Faulkner 
Faulkner 

Life 

SUNO 

Louisana College 

Belhaven 

Loyola 

Tougaloo 

William Carey 

Mobile 

Dillard 

Belhaven 

Xavier 

Tougaloo 

Louisiana College 

William Carey 

SUNO 

Xavier 

Loyola 

Dillard 

Mobile 

Tougaloo 

Dillard 

William Carey 



74 A PLACE TO GROW 





MENS BASKETBALL TEAM Front 
row: James Moore, Rory Wheeler, 
Jonathon Mays, Dwight Ladd. Middle row: 
Wall Harrison, Ronald Robinson, Eddie 
Timmons, Eric Campbell. Back row: Eric 
Lovett, Josh Frerman, Jason Allen, Alfonso 
Cueto, Chad Frazier. 



EDDIE TIMMONS guards the basket 
while a swarm of Loyola players surround 
him on January 16. His watchful eye must 
have helped because not only did Spring 
Hill win, but Eddie was the top rebounder 



or the game. 



MEN'S BASKETBALL 75 



B 
A 
S 
K 
E 
T 
B 
A 
L 
L 



FOR THEIR LAST GAME against the 

University oi Mobile, the team members form a 
huddle in the middle oi St. Paul's Gymnasium on 
March 1 . This bonding strategy must have 
worked as they won 80-78. 

SHE SHOOTS, she scores. Alison Kahn 
may have scored for the Lady Badgers, but 
they were still ten points behind the Univer- 
sity of Mobile on March 3. 





76 A PLACE TO GROW 





A SLAM DUNK for Eric Campbell in the 

first period leads him to the rank of top 
scorer along with Chad Frazier on February 
7. Their scores helped the team to victory 
over Tougaloo with 79-62. 

A LOT OF HARD WORK pays off for 
Donmcka Marrin, as she leads the Lady 
Badgers to vicrory over William Carey 
College. She scored 24 points in the 
January 23 name. 



BASKETBALL 77 




78 A PLACE TO GROW 



Scoreboard B 

— A 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 



Opponet Score 



s 



Concordia 


103-57 




Concordia 


119-35 




Lipscomb 
Uniion 


69-76 
68-102 


K 


AUM 


69-75 




West Florida 


63-66 


E 


Judson 
Talladega 


89-61 
84-68 


West Florida 


90-80 




Talladega 


61-62 


T 


Worcester Poly 


79-47 


SUNO 


68-59 


Louisiana College 


61-77 




Belhaven 


82-44 


B 


Loyola 


92-72 


Tougaloo 


80-75 


William Carey 


54-50 




Mobile 
Dillard 


52-64 
60-50 


A 


Belhaven 


73-41 




Xavier 


43-63 


L 


Dillard 


54-67 


Tougaloo 


72-80 


Louisiana College 


70-86 




AUM 


40-78 


L 


William Carey 


64-69 


SUNO 


50-53 


Xavier 


58-66 




Loyola 


86-55 




Mobile 


75-77 




Mobile 


59-69 


WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 79 



Scoreboard 



B 
A 
S 
E 
B 
A 
L 
L 



BASEBALL 



Date Opponet 

2/7 Barry University 

2/8 Lambuth University 

2/8 Barry University 

2/11 West Florida 

2/19 AUM 

2/19 AUM 

3/8 Louisiana College 

3/8 Louisiana College 

3/9 Viterbo 

3/9 Viterbo 

3/12 West Florida 

3/15 Loyola University 

3/15 Loyola University 

3/20 Montevallo 

3/20 Montevallo 

3/22 Univer. of Mobile 

3/22 Univer. of Mobile 

3/24 Lee College 

3/25 Lee Collefe 

3/25 Lee College 

3/26 Union University 

3/28 Indiana U. 

3/28 William Carey 

3/28 William Carey 

3/31 Gulf Coast Christian 

3/31 Gulf Coast Christian 

4/5 Belhaven 

4/5 Belhaven 

4/9 Faulkner 

4/9 Faulkner 

4/12 Louisiana College 

4/12 Louisiana College 

4/14 Belhaven 

4/14 Belhaven 

4/1 7 Gulf Coast Christian 

4/17 Gulf Coast Christian 

4/19 Loyola University 

4/19 Loyola University 

4/21 Montevallo 

4/22 William Carey 

4/24 Hintigdon College 

4/24 Huntingdon Collee 

4/29 AUM 

4/29 AUM 

4/30 Huntingdon College 

4/30 Huntingdon College 

5/1 Univer. of Mobile 

5/1 Univer. of Mobile 

5/7 Univer. of Mobile 

5/8 William Carey 

5/9 William Carey 

5/9 William Carey 

5/1 3 Texas Lutheran 

5/14 LSU-Shreveport 

5/15 U. of Incarnate Word 



80A PLACE TO GROW 





BASEBALL TEAM Front row: Matt Day, 
Mack Cormier, Brian Rabal, Chris Symons, 
Tony Simoncini, Dan Presnell. Second row: 
Joss Vinson, Al Gonzalez, George O'dwyer, 
Jason Kelly, Tim Hilpert, Mike Brahner, 
Jor Morris, Brian Winland. Third row: 
Coach Frank Sims, Mike Cummins, David 
Baez, Shea Grandquest, Steve Dewitt, 
Darrell McPherson, Joey Helton, Steve 
Stokes, Jason Keuhl, John Steen, Stephen 
Quina, Mark Thompson. Fourth row:, J.J, 
Poiroux, Dan Rhames, Mitch Ackai, Brett 
Worley, ColinUter, Eric Busby, Zion 
Wooldridge, Bo Gunn, Daniel Veres, Jared 
Labue, Trae McGill. 



TEAMMATES Daniel Veres, Colin titer, 
Micheal Brabner, Shae Grandquest, Darrell 
McPherson, Joe Morris, Stephen Stokes, 
and John Steen bask in the glory ot victory 
after their last University of Mobile game. 
The team won 20-3 on May 7. 



BASEBALL 81 



s 



c 
c 

E 
R 



Scoreboard 





MEN'S SOCCER 


Date 


Opponet 


8/31 


Spaulding 


9/1 


Huntingdon 


9/6 


Thomas 


9/11 


LaGrange 


9/21 


Lincoln 


9/22 


Millsaps 


9/25 


William Carey 


9/28 


Life 


9/29 


Martin Methodist 


10/2 


Belhaven 


10/3 


Montevallo 


10/5 


Belmont 


10/6 


Huntsville 


10/12 


Birmingham Southern 


10/18 


West Florida 


10/20 


Lambuth 


10/25 


Mary Holmes 


10/26 


Mobile 



82 A PLACE TO GROW 













MEN'S SOCCER Front row: Jimmy 
Herzog, Mark Sims, Casey Swanson, 
Tim Blader, Chris Stephans, Terry 
Hillery, Adrian Capote, Dan Liana, 
Michael Plaisance, Nathan Burkett. 
Back Row: Brentt Palmer, |ohn 
Watson, Travis Stone, Kekoa Park, 
Zack Pickels, Nate Rice, Ashley 
Monif, Steve Wingbermuehle, David 
Roberts, Robbie Robichaux, Chris 
Kramer, Head Coach Pat Pendleton. 



Zack Pickels makes an attempt to 
get the ball headed in the other 
direction. 



~S 






MEN'S SOCCER 83 



s 
o 
c 
c 

E 

R 





WITH MUCH MIGHT Chris Kramer 
launches the soccer ball ahead of 
himself. 




STACY AKERS runs after the ball a 
part of her warm up before a garni 



84 A PLACE TO GROW 





i'tmm Hill 



■gffiB 

§m 




TAKING A BREATHER from the vigor- 
ous game, Lisa Holyfield and Whitney 
Bain keep their eyes on the field for 
the other team's strategy. 



' odkf- 



?s adk 



adld ( 




SOCCER 85 



AS GRACEFUL AS A DANCER but as 

forceful as a hurricane, Holly Yots sends 
the ball flying away with one swift kick. 



WOMEN'S SOCCER Front Row: Kristin 
Fetty, Olivia Marino, Tracey Vines, Stacy 
Akers, Izzy Wilson, Jessica Thompson, 
Marianne Russo, Jennifer Scalici, Karen 
Trujillo. Back row: Patty Workman, Damie 
Turpin, Traci Buchanan, Lisa Holyfield, 
Whitney Bain, Head Coach Al Borchardt, 
Sylvia Cuesta, Rebecca Kibbe, Tara Moore, 
Michelle Gormanous, Rayne Pacek, Holly 
Yots. 




^ 



# 




86 A PLACE TO GROW 



Scoreboard 





WOMEN'S SOCCER 




ate 


Opponent 


Score 


'31 


Spaulding 


0-1 


'3 


Belhaven 


2-1 


'6 


Birmingham Southern 


0-0 


7 


Missouri Baptist 


0-11 


'8 


Sewanee 


2-2 


'11 


LaGrange 


2-0 


'15 


Montevallo 


1-0 


'18 


William Carey 


0-1 


'21 


Lincoln 


0-1 


'22 


Huntsville 


7-0 


'28 


Belhaven 


0-3 


)/5 


Mobile 


0-7 


)/12 


McKendree 


3-3 


)/13 


Lambuth 


0-5 


)/19 


Bartesville 


3-2 


)/20 


Millsaps 


2-1 


J/26 


Loyola 


2-1 


J/29 


West Florida 


0-4 


/2 


Huntingdon 


0-3 


/3 


Loyola 


0-0 



s 
o 
c 
c 

E 
R 



WOMEN'S SOCCER 87 



T 
E 






ITS PRACTICE as usual for Fernando 
Roclngues as he keeps his eye on the ball. 




Scoreboard 



JM 




MEN'S TENNIS 




TVT 


Date 


Opponet 


Scon 


JLV 


2/1 


Loyola University 


74 




2/8 


Dillard University 


7j 


T 


2/8 


Xavier University 


6- 


x 


2/17 


Belhaven College 


5-: 




2/20 


Jeff Davis College 


3- 


^^- 


3/1 


BYU - Hawii 


M 


Q 


3/6 


Webber College 


o-: 


O 


3/8 


Xavier University 


7-( 




3/10 


Berry College 


1-1 




3/14 


Lamar University 


0- 




3/14 


Univer. of Ner Orleans 


o-: 




3/15 


William Carey College 


i-i 




3/22 


Huntingdom 


2-: 




3/23 


Union University3-4 






4/1 


Jones College 


74 




4/7 


Univer. of West Alabama 


o-: 




4/12 


Belhave College 


1-1 




4/13 


Huntingdon College 


2 J 




4/15 


Univer. of Mobile 


o-: 


88 A PLACE TO GROW 










EVEN THOUGH TIM BARNES AND 

TOM LANE lost their doubles match 
against Belhaven, Spring Hill's tennis team 
won overall. 



Scoreboard 



•ate 



WOMEN'S TENNIS 

Opponet 



Score 



/1 


Loyola University 


7-0 




/8 


Dillard University 


6-1 




/8 


Xavier University 


7-0 




120 


Jeff Davis College 


5-2 




122 


Louisiana College 


7-0 




/I 


BYU - Havvii 


0-7 




/8 


Xavier University 


7-0 




/9 


Delta State University 


3-4 




110 


Berry College 


4-3 




|15 


William Carey College 


1-8 




/22 


Huntingdon 


7-0 




113 


Huntingdon 


4-3 




/15 


Univer. of Mobile 


0-7 


TENNIS 89 



c 

R 
O 
S 
S 



C 

XT 
N 
T 
R 
Y 



Standings 

CROSS COUNTRY 

The Spring Hill Cross Country Team tied for third place in 

the conference meet. 




CROSS COUNTRY at Conference 
Meet. Front row: Deon Kerne, Lesa 
Paille, Heather Wingard. Back row: 
Erin Stover, Susie Saint, Mary 
Munger, Glynna Haase, Megan 
Johnson, Megan Ford, Mandy 
Brodtman, Coach James Walker, and 
Renee Thiry. 



THEY'VE RUN THEIR COURSE, 

Megan Ford and Susie Saint sit back 
and kick off their shoes after racing at 
the University of Southern Mississippi 
on September 20. 




90 A PLACE TO GROW 







WARMING UP are Renee Thiry, 
Heather Wingard, and Mary 
Munger. After a few minutes, these 
racers were ready to run the 
Conference Meet in downtown 
Mobile on November 2. 







ALL ALONG the course of the meet 
at the University of South Alabama 
on September 27, Deon Kerne and 
Megan Ford kept up with one 
another. 



CROSS COUNTRY 91 



6 

L 
P 



Standings 



MEN'S GOLF 



Spring Hill's Men's Golf Team ranked fourth in the nation 





KEITH HOARD is the Individual 
Male National Champion. 



92 A PLACE TO GROW 



Standings 



WOMEN'S GOLF 



Spring Hill's Women's Golf Team ranked third in the 

nation. 



■Hlc^ mm 








^p 


* 




j/fTi 


• ,;.. ' 


A i 


' ' A ^ 


» 






JL^F 



'->&••**> &«-..j 




/ 



NNAH KREHLING is the Female 
:ional Champion. 



GOLF 93 



CHEERLEADERS 



c 

H 

E 
E 

B. In The Spirit 
L 

E 
A 
D 
E 
R 

S 




CHEERLEADERSFront row: Adrienrn| 
Dixon, Captain and Marisa Theriot, 
Co-captain. Middle row: Ely 
Comeno, Lauren Moore, and 
Laneetra Dees. Back row: Betsy 
Camerio, Katrina Smith, Aerin 
Gombos, Carmen Montgomery, an 
Valerie Huff. 



94 A PLACE TO GROW 




FRIENDSHIP is one of the benefits of 
being on the squad. Co-captain 
Marisa Theriot and Captain Adrienne 
Dixon have become great friends 
because of this connection. 



MORAL SUPPORT and 

encouragement are major functions 
of cheerleaders. Through this role, 
they become close to their team. 




CHEERLEADERS 95 






A 

Spring Hill offers the 
perfect environment to 
make new friends. The 
campus is small and so is 
the population, ensuring 
that everyone knows just 
about everyone else. It 
becomes more than a 

PLACE 

school, it becomes a 
home. Every face here, 
be it a student or a mem- 
ber of the faculty, staff, 
or administration, is usu- 
ally a friendly one. It is 
these friends that will 
carry on throughout a 
lifetime. 



K 



rian Geary, Tanner Johnson, and 
Robbie Robichaux know how to spend 
quality time with theit friends, have fun. 
Derby Days presented one of the best 
opportunities to just be wild and crazy. 

\\l Umbers of Phi Mu sorority had becc 
closer than friends, they were sisters. Thi' 
bond made at Spring Hill will be with 
them forever. 




TO MAKE FRIENDS 



96 A PLACE TO GROW 



. . 




f 





A PLACE TO MAKE FRIENDS 97 




cmors 



Ti 



hey are a year (or more) older, 
wiser, and more experienced. Seniors 
have helped pave the path ahead. 
The following pages show who they 
are. Some of them have provided 
the words of inspiration that helped 
them make the long haul to 
graduation. 



yq is a wostt ojj tk£. l\j you use, tde, 
ocpehl&tt wisely" 

, -by Podk 
Submitted by JoKk Ma/^cfe 



Jan Adams 
Mobile, AL 



Stacy Akers 
Murfreesboro, TN 



Kari Alexander 
Theodore, AL 



Tracy Allu 
Ft. Washington, PA 



Angie Arceneaux 
Metaire, LA 









98 A PLACE TO GROW 




Jason Aubuchon 
St. Louis, MO 

Janice Aylsworth 
Elton, LA 

Alison Barnes 
Kempton, PA 



Cynthia Baroco 
Pensacola, FL 

Brinin Behrend 
Guilford, CT 

Paola Bertorini 
Memphis, TN 

Jeff Bird 
West Chester, OH 

Julie Blackstone 
Augusta, GA 

Sarah Bond 
Mobile, AL 

Michael Brabner 
Theodore, AL 

Ashley Buckhaults 
Mobile, AL 

Francois Cady 
Shreveport, LA 

Tabitha Carter 
Lucedale, MS 

Melissa Chuilli 
Mobile, AL 

Katina Conboy 
Mobile, AL 



SENIORS 99 



Rebecca Cox 
Mobile, AL 

Alfonso Cueto 
Coral Gables, FL 

Lance Daugherty 
Foley, AL 



Patrick Davie 
Nashville, TN 

Nicholas DeVito 
Shaker Heights, OH 

Sam DiBenedetto 
Foley, AL 

Doug Doyle 
Wilmington, DE 

Natalie Echeverria 
Miami, FL 

Clarence Elcan 
Nashville, TN 

Jennifer Ellison 
Fairhope, AL 

Sarah Esslineer 
Miami, FL 

Chad Frazier 
Richland, MS 

Jim Fry 
Cheltenham, PA 

Melissa Gallagher 
Covington, LA 

John Gamble 
Monroeville, AL 




100 A PLACE TO GROW 






* 



Gloria Garcia 
Pensacola, FL 



Shannon Garrett 
Houston, TX 



Reid Gilbert 
New Orleans, LA 




Leo Gilmore 
Fairhope, AL 



Jaleh Habib 
Mobile, AL 



"J^ot eDenutRinQ dies." 
toKtJubutea by Km ZMott 



"I LO^fE THIS S**7!" 
combated by Toia Pcjqk 



SENIORS 101 



T toofe 4e nood Eess 
kouehd and ta Ras wadi 

all it djyfreJiewCe." 

^owMbuted by Ki/isten Kot) 



"<He wRo daugRs, Casts." 

-by Mew Pettibon6 

Pook 

combated by Suzanne. 

Pobbett 



Pat Halaszyn 
Missouri City, TX 



Anne Hamilton 
Ellisville, MO 



Tim Harris 
Greenville, MS 



Renee Hinton 
Spanish Fort, LA 



Lori Johnson 
Dallas, TX 







1 02 A PLACE TO GROW 




Megan Johnson 
Louisville, KY 

Shayla Jones 
Mobile, AL 

Alison Kahn 
Metarie, LA 



Karen Kelly 
Foley, AL 

Leon Kennedy 
Mobile, AL 

Brooke Kerekes 
Eaton, OH 

Deon Kerne 
Mandeville, LA 

Kirsten Kolb 
Bay Minette, AL 

Ben Latino 
Matairie, LA 

Eric Lovett 
Eight Mile, AL 

Kelly Manwaring 
Mobile, AL 

John Marsalis 
Murfreesboro, TN 

Michelle Mazdra 
St. Louis, MO 

Amanda Messina 
Daphne, AL 

Stephanie Moran 
Dunwoody, GA 



SENIORS 103 



James Morris 
Mobile, AL 

Joseph Morris 
Miami, FL 

Kathleen Murray 
Mobile, AL 



Josh Nassef 
Pensacola, FL 

Thao Nguyen 
Mobile, AL 

Kevin Northrop 
Pass Christian, MS 

Jennifer Osiecki 
Jacksonville, FL 

Mitch Parsons 
Spanish Fort, AL 



Edgard Perez 
Miami, FL 



Charles Petite 
Mobile, AL 

Joyelle Reed 
Mobile, AL 

Sarah Rives 
Lexington, KY 

Suzanne Robbert 
Deltona, FL 

Barbara Roberts 
Mobile, AL 



Tara Ryan 
Chicago, IL 




1 04 A PLACE TO GROW 






!\ -«"» V 







Kimberly Rys 
Largo, FL 



Scott Salathe 
Harvey, LA 



Leslie Schraeder 
Mobile, AL 



Amy Sensel 
Crestview Hills, KY 



Nathan Shapard 
Oklahoma City, OK 



Don't Quit 
S^/Hen tilings go wiong, 

J\s> tRet) SOWfifiWfiS Wlft; 

Sv/Ren tRe load you lie 

tnudoing 
Saeins aft up 
Si/Ren tRe {jUrcIs cuie. Cow, 

and tRe debts cute. RigR T 
-Ad you want to s^de, 
"But you Roue to sigR, 
S^Ren cate is p/tessing 
pu down a bet, 
'est i(y you must, 
1?ut don't you quit. 

Contributed by J/icMas 
DeWito 



SENIORS 105 



Angela Shaw 
Coden, AL 

John Steen 
Metairie, LA 

Susannah Teasdale 
Miami, FL 



Denise Thomas 
Hernando, MS 

Jessica Thompson 
Nashville, TN 

Eddie Timmons 
Slidell, LA 

Valerie Uteg 
Fairhope, AL 

Brian van Pottelsberghe 
Cincinnati, OH 

Tracey Vines 
Fairhope, AL 

Meredith Walls 
St. Peter, MO 

Karen Wilder 
Houma, LA 

Chad Wilson 
Midland, MI 

Heather Wolfort 
Metairie, LA 

Katherine Yester 
Birmingam, AL 

Molly York 
Walnut Creek, CA 




106 A PLACE TO GROW 




Kent Zirlott 
Coden, AL 



ll 




we. OSl weet again ow 
■$& otReJi side. o|j tRe. 
wQteiis." 

cowfjubuted bu McW& 
Mctzaxa 



SENIORS 107 



iihHMLAtfH*ih 



^umoH, fopkomowf, mb freshmen 



Alex Adams 

Lori Adams 

Tiffany Adams 

Sarah Adeent 

leniHer Aguillard 



Gary Albert 

George Alexander 

Jason Allen 

Julia Allen 

Mike Anderson 



Matthew Andrews 

David Angredina 

Lisa Arceneaux 

Julie Arlinghaus 

Allison Armbruster 




108 A PLACE TO GROW 
















H&\ 


^<*&Wm 








Makfl 




1- 1 


■Mi. 





^ace* to ^e»neiHfce«* 



^fngelle Whitman is groovy in her Coca- 
cola bell bottoms. Her ensemble was 
actually her costume for Phi Mu's 
Woodstock. 



Emily Armbruster 

Stephanie Arnold 

David Aurisdano 

Elaine Aycock 

Sherry Aycock 



Kazimieras Baczinskas 

Brent Baggett 

Kendal Balkom 

Ann Barilleaux 

Shayla Barnes 



Brian Bauer 

Jacob Bauer 

David Beaugh 

Lora Beene 

Nicole Beers 



UNDERCLASSMEN 109 



Heather Bell 

Ananne Benedetti 

Adrienne Berg 

Katie Berg 

Rebekah Besnard 



Beth Ann Bigley 

Tim Blader 

Erika Blattenberger 

Cameron Blau 

Lena Blount 



Nicholas Boeke 

Jon Bork 
Bennett Bowers 

Megan Boyle 
Walter Bracewell 



Liz Braley 

Ginger Brodtman 

Mandy Brodtman 

Thomas Brogan 

Billy Brookshire 



Jacqueline Brouilette 

Chris Bryant 

Cara Buckley 

Theresa Bueche 

Frank Butterfield 




110 A PLACE TO GROW 




Peter Buttrey 

Mary Caiola 

Betsy Camerio 

Eric Campbell 

Laura Campbell 



Arnaldo Capote 

Marie Carmody 

James Carpenter 

Kinnette Carrio 

Brian Caruso 



Steven Caruso 

Burt Cestia 

Phonexay 

Chanthaleuangsy 

Morgan Chiapella 

Daphne Childress 



Anne Marie Cinnater 

Alfred Claud 

Brandi Clear 

McGhie Cochran 

Jennifer Coheley 



Regina Coleman 

Ely Comerio 

Paul Connolly 

Paola Conosciani 

Kara Cook 



UNDERCLASSMEN 111 



Kandee Cooley 

Robbie Corely 

Caroline Couvillon 

Brian Cox 

Clay Cozart 



Frances Craig 

John Crane 

Dovie Crawford 

Charles Crow 

Bersy Crump 



Melvin Crump 
Danielle Cruthirds 

Sylvia Cuesta 
Michael Cummins 

Monique Curet 



Dorothy Curry 

Elvia D'Orcy 

Paul Dahm 

Kiona Daniels 

Claire Darbonne 



Elizabeth Davis 

Vernon Davis 

Lanetrica Dees 

Jennifer Delcambre 

Aiden Denagall 




112 A PLACE TO GROW 









•M*4i 





Kate Dennis 

Dominique deSanctis 

Emery DeSonier 

James Devaney 

Laura Dicas 



Jonathan Dick 
Amy DiPiazza 
Christie Disser 
Adrienne Dixon 
Jennifer Dodd 



Kelly Doherty 

Patrick Dolan 

Robert Drakeford 

Christopher Duke 

Kelly Dyson 



Ben Early 
Darmita Easterling 

Amanda Eberle 
Shivonne Edwards 

Tonya Edwards 



Kelly Egbert 

Erik Eide 
Brian Ellender 
Charles Evans 
Charles Eveler 



UNDERCLASSMEN 113 



Cedric Fernandes 

Maggie Fernandez 

Mimi Finzel 

Dolly Flisk 

Kelly Flynn 



Renee Fontana 

Tianna Fontenette 

Richard Foote 

Megan Ford 

Audra Foret 



Marie Forsdick 

Lacey Fox 

Alisha Fredrickson 

Josh Frerman 

David Fritsch 



ft 

l/cn Goldman befriends a doe at Zooland 
while helping with gardening. This 
friendship was made possible by Circle K's 
camping trip to Gulf Shores. 





^ IT 












114 A PLACE TO GROW 




Ellen Fulsham 

Emily Gaia 
Meredith Galey 
Monique Gullet 
Lawrence Garcia 



Pierre Gaudin 
Simone Gaudin 

Brian Geary 
Tracey Gemmer 

Jason Gerth 



Nick Gilmore 
Brittney Glass 

Lara Goeke 
Aerin Gombos 

Al Gonzales 







£fi*lKH ^PBv-ffeK' 


Ifc. ; - /SP^wr ^1 I |H 




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UJA Lum* — *<* "■ Jy - *w •*' JJBK3 


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^Ace* to ^efHefH&e* 



**ven over the music of the band and lots 
of dancing, Nicole Harris and Alvin West 
find a moment to chat. However, they were 
both having such a good time dancing at 
the Mardi Gras Ball in the USS Alabama 
Battleship Hanger that it was not long 
before they were both back on the dance 
floor. 



UNDERCLASSMEN 115 



Amy Gonzales 

Amy Goreham 

Michelle Gormanous 

Kathryn Graml 

Jennifer Granger 



Amber Greenwall 

Jeffrey Gruber 

Glynna Haase 

Ixchel Habet 

Katrine Habib 



Leigh Ellen Hall 
Harry Hardin 

Sarah Hargrave 
Nicole Harris 

Jaclyn Harrison 



Wali Harrison 

Brian Harry 

Jennifer Hartrich 

Tracey Hartzog 

Christine Hawes 



Ryan Hayes 

Lauren Hebert 

Sean Hengesbach 

Juan Hernosilla 

James Herzog 




116 A PLACE TO GROW 




Emily Hewitt 
Duffy Higgens 
Terty Hillery 
Tim Hilpert 
Jeff Hilperts 



Kay Holloman 

Ellen Holt 

Pamela Horn 

Theodore Hubbell 

Valerie Huff 



David Hughes 

Wes Hyland 

Michelle Ikhimokpa 

Jennifer Jackson 

Alicia Jacob 



Kelly James 

Kelly Jernigan 

Susanne Jersa 

Buck Johnson 

Joseph Johnson 



Latrese Johnson 

Tanner Johnson 

Katie Joyce 

Nancy Kaffer 

Philip Kahn 



UNDERCLASSMEN 117 



Kristen Kammer 

Ravi Kanade 

Jason Kelly 

Ryan Kendall 

Rebecca Kibbe 



Beth Kick 

Shree Kinard 

Anna Klepser 

Kelly Kline 

Mary Janelle Knoble 



Michael Koeing 

Jill Kreller 

Michelle Krulewicz 

Lilah Kulakowski 

Robert Kupper 



Dwight Ladd 
Thomas Lane 
Justin Lariscy 
Michael Laskowski 
Leslie Lassose 



Peter Laurence 

Anjanette LeBlanc 

DeCree Lee 

Joyce Lee 

Rebecca Lee 




118 A PLACE TO GROW 




Ryan Lee 
Valerie Likely 

Lynsey Lobb 
Ginger Logan 

Hope Lucas 



Michelle Lund 

Owen Lyons 

Erica Mabry 

Giciget Maceluch 

John Majorkiewicz 



Seann Malloy 
Billie Sue Malone 
Ellen Man«;elsclorf 

Olivia Marino 
Donmeka Martin 



Melissa Martin 

Barbie Martino 

Angelita Massey 

Jennifer Masters 

Jill Mathias 



Jonathon Mays 
Jessica McCawley 

Erin McCloskey 
John McCormick 
Alex McDermott 



UNDERCLASSMET 119 



Margaret McDowell 

Trae McGill 

Megan Meagner 

Theresa Meeks 

Rachel Messer 



Jodi Metz 

Elizabeth Meztista 

Kelly Miears 

Cynthia Miller 

Nancy Miller 



Megan Mims 
DeeDee Mitchell 

Karla Mitchell 
Patrick Mitchell 

Ashley Monif 



Tami Monk 

Carmen Montgomery 

James Moore 

Lauren Moore 

Michael Moore 



Molly Moran 
Olivia Moran 

Koji Mori 

Kevin Morris 

Alison Mougey 




120 A PLACE TO GROW 




Mary Munger 
Jennifer Nalu 

Christine Nelson 
Tim Nesser 

Karin Nordhaus 



Jaime O'Beirne 

Maggie Obringer 

Keiko Ogawa 

Michael Ori 

Corey Oubre 



Rayne Pacek 
Scott Parks 

Todd Parsons 
Daniel Patti 

Byron Patureau 



David Peek 

Nancy Perez 

Farrah Pettis 

Michael Plaisance 

Robert Poher 



Imani Porter 

Terri Lynn Potts 

Marcus Pruitt 

Sara Radulski 

Bryan Rahal 



UNDERCLASSMEN 121 



Brad Rametta 
Eloise Ramey 
Addie Ramos 
Regina Rapier 
Amanda Ray 



Becky Reed 

Christopher Reese 

Joseph Reeves 

Amanda Renkl 

Thomas Reynolds 



h 



lew graduate, Tara Ryan, and James 
DeVaney take in the sights after the 
graduation ceremonies. While James was 
not a graduate, he did enjoy the post- 
graduation reception on May 1 1 . 




^"ocet to ^emetnfeefr 



122 A PLACE TO GROW 




Mende Ritch 

Aaron Rives 

David Roberts 

Jennifer Roberts 

Kimberlyn Robinson 



Ronald Robinson 

Christopher Roselle 

Michael Ross 

Miryam Rubio 

Daphne Ruffin 



»n the mass confusion before the Mardi 
Gras parade, Sara Rives and Amy Gonzalez 
discuss the Delta Delta Delta float, 
"Singing in the Rain". Unfortunatley, 
neither of them got to ride on the float but 
Sara, who was the Tri-Delta president, did 
ride in the parade, as queen. 



UNDERCLASSMEN 123 



Lynn Rush 

Erin Russell 

Marianne Russo 

Kevin Rys 

Susan Saint 



Tatiana Salinas 
Jeff Salsiccia 

Trisha Sandahl 
Anne Sauget 
Deinit Sayasy 



Brent Scalia 

Jennifer Scalici 

Timothy Scanlin 

Mike Scheidt 
Colleen Schmelzer 



Spankie Schmidt 

Todd Schuler 

Pauline Schwalm 

Bridgette Scott 

Christopher Scott 



J.T. Scott 

Janon Seals 

Templa Sens 

Elise Seymore 

Tony Simoncini 




124 A PLACE TO GROW 




Mark Sims 

Jaime Slocum 

Christina Smith 

Jamila Smith 

Jon Smith 



Katrina Smith 

Monique Sommer 

Stephen Sparks 

Heather Spence 

Princess Spencer 



Brenden Sprague 

Patrick Sprague 

Rudolph Spreckelsen 

Brandi Stapp 

Jessica Starr 



Gretchen Statt 

Emily Stevens 

Scott Stevens 

Erin Stover 

Renee Straub 



Lindsey Stuardi 

Patricia Sullivan 

Paul Sulzbacher 

Jake Sweeney 

Jason Swenk 



UNDERCLASSMEN 125 



Anita Szady 

Julie Ta 

Junko Takushige 

Kerri Tedesco 

Elizabeth Tetley 



Matisa Theriot 

Michael Thiel 

Lanesha Thomas 

Matthew Thompson 

Kathtyn Thotell 



Candice Tisdale 

Daphne Triplett 

Karen Trujillo 

Maggie Tsaltas 
Ben Tupper 



Alice Tumi 

Tommy Ullo 

Colin Uter 

Laura Van Eepoel 

Tevis VanDerGrifr 



Christina Verdone 

Melissa Vondenstein 

Maria Walley 

Brooks Walters 

Lydia Washington 




126 A PLACE TO GROW 




Jonathan Watson 

Brian Weber 

Deborah Weiss 

Amy Welch 
Benitta Wesco 



Alvin West 

Rory Wheeler 

Dean White 

Angelle Whitman 

Ella Williams 



Gidset Williams 

Taylor Williams 

Wycondia Williams 

Jabana Willis 

Mark Wilson 



Robert Wilson 

Tracey Wilson 

Heather Wingard 

Catherine Witrey 

Patrick Wittenbrink 



Chad Woelke 

Donyee Woodyard 

Patty Workman 

Brett Worley 

Alison Wuest 



UNDERCLASSMEN 127 



Sean Yanes 
Marcelyn Yates 

Holly Yots 
Chris Zintrarelli 




ft 

l/caring the 1 ri-Delta banner, Mandy 
Brodtman and Shivunne Edwards walk 
ahead of rheir sororiry sisters. The rest of 
the group followed in ponchos and carrying 
umbrellas to let everyone know that their 
theme was "Singing In the Rain". 



128 A PLACE TO GROW 



facet to l^etHCHiUit 





rT^ part of the activities fot Mattin Luthet 
King, Jr. Day, a memorial is held in 
McLean Plaza. Melvin Crump, Alex 
McDermott, Vicky Conn, and Robert 
[Clipper stood with bowed heads and lit 
candles in memory of Dr. King. 



Vne of SGA's weekly programs for 
students is Movie Night in the Cloister. So 
while trying to study, Kelly Dyson sat back 
to watch The American President . 



UNDERCLASSMEN 129 







acuity 



Staff & 



Administration 



.Employees of the Marriott Corporation 
keep students well fed. As members of the 
staff, they were indispensable. 



Dr. Celcstine Algero, Teacher 

Education 

Dr. Maureen Beanan, Biology 

Bro. Ferrell Blank, Operations 

Dr. Charles Boyle, Languages & 

Literature/ Library Archives 
Dr. Melvin Brandon, Philosophy 



Gwen Brightbill, Student 

Development 

Tresea Buckhaults, Student 

Services 

Rev. Stephen Campbell SJ, Fine & 

Performing Arts 

Dr. Timothy Carmody, Theology 

Susan Clinton, Social Sciences 




130 A PLACE TO GROW 




Lee Covey, President's Office 
Dr. Emmanuel Cutrone, Theology 
Monde Donaldson, Development 

Office 

Dr. Nader EntessarPolitical Science 

Terry Fowler, Student Services 



Dr. George Gilmore, Theology 
Deepthi Guneratne, Science Lab 
Dr. Ranil Guneratne, Chemistry 
Rev. Frederick Gunti, Theology 
Melodie Halliday, Teacher 
Education 



FACULTY 131 



Rev. William Harmless SJ, 

Theolog) 

Dr. Patricia Harrison, History 

Dottie Hempfling, Communication 

Arts 

Dr. Carol Henderson, Nursing 

Mindy Hovell, Development 

Office 



Carol Hughes, Athletics 

Greta Jahnke, Development Office 

Dr. Micheal Johnson, Business & 

Management 

Kenneth Juul, Business & 

Management 
Alfred Kojima, Athletics 



Dr. Alexander Landi, Political 

Science 

Dr. Stewart Langdon, Business & 

Management 

Ray Lauten, Development Office 

Bebe Lindsey, Development Office 

Thomas Loehr, Communication 

Arts 



Dr. John Macnamara, Biology 

Charles Mason, Upward Bound 

Marilyn Milligan, Mailroom 

Kristie Mize, Development Office 

Dr. Jeanne Moon, Student 

Development 



Jose Moreno-Lacalle, Development 

Office 

Wendy Morgan, Fine & 

Performing Arts 

Josetta Mulloy, Student 

Development 

Joseph Niland, Student Services/ 

Athletics 

Dr. Kathleen Orange, Social 

Science/ Foley Center 




132 A PLACE TO GROW 




Lesa Paille, Student Services 

Sidney Pearson, Campus Security 

Margaret Phillips, Academic 

Affairs/ Computing 

Julie Prerost, Student Services 

Rev. Gerald Regan SJ, Biology 



Rev. Robert Rimes SJ, Theology 

Linda Robinson, Finance 

Leola Sanders, Mailroom 

Bobbie Springer, Student Services 

Barbara Starr, Fine & Performing 

Arts 



Dr. Mark Starr, Philosophy 

Esther Stokes, Development Office 

Chante' Stone-Henclrix, 

Admissions 
Wanda Sullivan, Fine & 

Performing Arts 

David Susina, Student 

Development 



Ira Swingle, Music 
Glenda Thompson, Development 

Office 

Mark Thompson, Student Services 

Mark Thomson, Finance 

Rev. Christopher Viscardi SJ, 

Theology 



James Walker, Athletics 

Kath Weber, Campus Minisrry 

Rev. Michael Williams SJ, English 

Mary York, Health Services 



FACULTY 133 



Index 



A 





I his school became 
more than just a school. 
It became a place to go, 
to belong, to run and 
play, and to make 
friends. It was a place to 
find out who we were 
and where we were 

PLACE 

headed. Some of us 
found love. Some found 
goals. However, some of 
us found out who we re- 
ally were. It was not just 
the place where we 
found ourselves, it hel- 
ped us find ourselves. 



«Z^he IS - 



; dressed up and ready to go out 
and have a far out time. Lauren Hebert is 
prepaired for Phi Mu's Woodstock. 

A 

*S liter four years of the good, the bad, 
and the uglyjim Fry graduates. He is all 
smiles as Father Rewak hands him his 
diploma. 




■I 

w 




TO FIND YOURSELF 



134 A PLACE TO GROW 




A PLACE TO FIND YOURSELF 135 



A 



Ackal, Mitch 81 

Adams, Alex L08 

Adams, David 25 

Adams, Jan 98 

Adams, Lori 108 

Adams, Tiffany .... 108 

Adgent, Sarah 108 

Aguillard, Jeniffer . . 108 
Akers, Stacy ... 25, 84, 
86, 98 
Albert, Gary . . 11, 108 
Alexander, George . . 28, 
108 
38, 
98 
130 
.37 
108 
108 
25,98 
.26 
108 
108 
53, 
108 
.98 
108 
108 



75, 



Alexander, K.ari 

Algero, Dr. C 
Alise, Jason . 
Allen, Jason . 
Allen, Julia . 
Allu, Tracy 
Alpha Kappa Alpha 
Anderson, Mike . . 
Andrews, Matthew 
Angredina, David 



Arceneaux, Angie 

Arceneaux, Lisa . . 
Arlinghaus, Julie . 
Armbruster, Allison 

Armbruster, Emily 
Arnold, Stephanie 



108 
109 
19, 
109 
.99 
109 



Aubuchon, Jason 

Aurisdano, David . 

Autterson, Ted 59 

Aycock, Elaine 109 

Aycock, Sherry 109 

Aylsworth, Janice ..99 



B 



Back row, Heather W. 



Baez, David 

Baggett, Brent . 71, 

Bain, Whitney 

Baker, Ben 

Balkom, Kendal . . . . 
38, 
Banlleaux, Ann . . . . 
Barnes, Alison . . . . 
Barnes, Shayla . . 26 

Baroco, Cynthia . . 

Barrios, BJ 

Bartholomy, Mike . . 

Bauer, Brian 

Bauer, Jacob 

Beanan, Dr. M 

Beaugh, David 

Beene, Lora 

Beers, Nicole . . 48, 
Behrend, Brinin . . 
Bell, Heather ... 16 
59, 
Benedetti, Arianne . . 

Berg, Aclrienne 

Bert:, Katie ... 63, 
Bertoeini, Paola . . 
Besnard, Rebekah . . 
Bigley, Beth A 

Bilellio, Seth 

Bird, Jeff 

Blackstone, Julie . . 

Blacler, Tim ... 83, 
Blank, Bro. F 

Blattenberger, Erika 



90 



Baczinskas, Kazimieras 



Blau, Cameron 
Blount, Lena . 
Boeke, Nicholas 
Bond, Sarah . 
Borchardt, Al . 
Bork, Jon .... 
Bowers, Bennett 
Boyle, Dr. C. . 
Boyle, Megan . 
Brabner, Michael 

Bracewell, Walter 

Braley, Liz 

Brandon, Dr. M. 
Brightbill, Gwen 



70, 



25 



81 



.81 
109 
.85 
.36 
21, 
109 
109 
.99 
65, 
109 
.99 
.40 
42, 
43 
109 
109 
59, 
130 
109 
109 
109 
.99 
46, 
110 
110 
110 
110 
.99 
110 
61, 
110 
.28 
.99 
.99 
110 
130 

110 
110 
110 

no 

,99 

.86 
110 
110 
130 
110 
25, 
,99 
110 
1 10 
130 
130 



Brodtman, Ginger . . 29, 

110 

Brodtman, Mandy . . 29, 

48, 90, 110, 128 

Brogan, Tom . . . 34, 38, 

55, 110 

Brookshire, Billy . . . 20, 

110 
Brouilette, Jacqueline 

110 

Bryant, Chris 110 

Buchanan, Traci 86 

Buckhaults, Ashley 

3,99 
Buckhaults, Tresea . . 130 

Buckley, Cara 110 

Bueche, Theresa .... 52, 

110 

Burkett, Nathan 83 

Busby, Eric 81 

Butterfield, Frank ... 55, 

110 
Buttrey, Peter Ill 



c 



Cady, Francois 



Caiola, Mary . 
Callahan, Chad 
Camerio, Betsy 
Campbell, Eric 



Campbell, Laura 
Campbell SJ, Rev. 

Campus Ministry 



Capote, Adrian . 
Capote, Arnaldo 
Carmody, Dr. T. 



Carmody, Marie . 
Carpenter, James 
Carpenter, Matt , 

Carrio, Kinnette 
Carter, Tabitha 

Caruso, Brian . . . 
Caruso, Steven . 



. ... 28, 
99 

111 

. 53, 67 

94, 111 

. 75, 77, 

111 

. . .111 

S. 

130 
... 21, 
28, 29 
.83 
111 
23, 
130 
111 
111 
37, 
39, 43 
111 
.99 
11 1 
111 



40 



Cayer, Pepper .... 2, 25 

Cestia, Burt Ill 

Chance, Peter 40 

Chanthaleuangsy, 

Phonexay Ill 

Chiapella, Morgan . . 21, 
44, 111 
Childress, Daphne . . 28, 
52, 111 
Chomant, Christian . . 40 
Chuilli, Melissa ... 99, 

100 
Cinnater, Anne M. ..Ill 

Claud, Alfred Ill 

Clausell, Freddie 17 

Clear, Brandi Ill 

Clinton, Susan 130 

Cochran, McGhie ... 1 1 1 
Coheley, Jennifer ... 1 1 1 
Coleman, Regina ... 1 1 1 
Comerio, Ely ... 63, 94, 

111 
Conboy, Katina . . . 99, 

100 

Conn, Vicky 129 

Connolly, Paul Ill 

Connor, Molly 78 

Conosciani, Paola ... 1 1 1 

Cook, Kara Ill 

Cooley, Kandee .... 1 12 

Copote, Andy 40 

Corely, Robbie . . 8, 112 

Cormier, Mack 81 

Couvillon, Caroline 

112 

Covey, Lee 131 

Cox, Brian 6, 112 

Cox, Rebecca 16, 

100 
Cozart, Clay 29, 52, 

112 

Craig, Frances 112 

Crane, John 112 

Crawford, Dovie ... 1 12 
Crow, Charles . . 6, 112 

Crump, Betsy 112 

Crump, Melvin . 11, 22, 
28, 40, 112, 129 
Cruthirds, Danielle . . 112 
Cuesta, Sylvia . . 86, 112 
Cueto, Alfonso . 6, 25, 
75, 100 
Cummins, Michael . . 112 



109 



136 A PLACE TO GROW 



Cummins, Mike . 


81 


Disser, Christie . 28, 


Curet, Monique . 


. . . 63, 


Dixon, Adrienne . . 




1 12 


94, 95, 


Curry, Dorothy . 


...112 


Dodd, Jennifer . 38, 


Curtis, Ben . . 25, 


27, 40, 


Doherty, Kelly . 29, 




41 


Dolan, Patrick .... 


Cutrone, Dr. E. . 


...131 


Donaldson, Monde . 
Doyle, Doug . . 25 



D 



Drakeford, Robert . . 
Duke, Christopher . . 
Dyson, Kelly . 113, 



I L3 
57, 
1 13 
1 13 
1 13 
1 L3 
131 
29, 
100 
1 L3 
I L3 
129 



52, 
1 ? 



I I i 



D'Orcy, Elvia 


1 1 2 






D'Orcy, Elvia 


.78 


W^ 




Daddy, Meal 


.40 


iPv 




Dahm, Paul 


IP 


li 




Daniels, Kiona .... 


IP 






Darbonne, Claire . 2 


, 21, 


Early, Ben .... 15, 


1 13 




112 


Easterling, Darmita 




Daugherty, Harold 






113 




100 


Eberle, Amanda . . . . 


113 


Daugherty, Lance . . 


100 


Echeverria, Natalie 




Davie, Patrick . . . 


22, 


25, 


100 




100 


Edwards, Shivonne . . 


38, 


Davis, Dr. M 


30 

112 


48, 113, 
Edwards, Tonya . . . . 


1 ?8 


Davis, Elizabeth . . . 


61, 


Davis, Vernon .... 


1 P 




113 


Day, Matt 


.81 


Egbert, Kelly . . 78, 
Eide, Erik . 39, 43, 


1 1 ^ 


Dean, Brad 4t 


), 70 


113 


Dees, Laneetra .... 


.94 
IP 


Elcan, Cal 4C 
Elcan, Clarence . . . 


i, 41 


Dees, Lanetrica .... 


100 


Delcambre, Jennifer 


52, 


Ellencler, Brian .... 


1 1 1 




112 


Ellison, Jennifer . . 


100 


Delta Delta Delta . . 


.26 


Entessar, Dr. N. ... 


131 


Denagall, Aiclen . . . 


112 


Esslinger, Sarah . . 


30, 


Dennis, Kate 


113 




100 


deSanctis, Dominique 




Evans, Charles .... 


1 13 




113 


Eveler, Charles .... 


1 13 


DeSonier, Emery . . 


28, 
113 






Devaney, James . . . 


40, 


¥^ 




43, 70, 113, 


122 


r* 




DeVito, Nicholas 




i 




100, 


105 






DeVito, Nick . . . 4( 


), 41 


Fernandes, Cedric . . 


14, 


Dewitt, Steve 


. .81 


34, 36, 38, 42 


, 55, 


DiBenedetto, Sam 






114 


43, 


100 


Fernandez, Maggie . 


P, 


Dicas, Laura .... 12 


,46, 


63, 


114 


47, 59, 


113 


Fetty, Kristin 


86 


Dick, Jonathan .... 


.113 


Finzel, Mimi ...11 


, 39, 


DiPiazza, Amy . 63, 


113 


43, 46, 47, 


114 



Flisk, Dolly . 
Flynn, Kelly . 
Fontana, Renee .... 1 I i 
Fontenette, Tianna ..111 
Foote, Richard . . 12, 38, 
39, 42, 55, 65, 1 11 
Ford, Megan ... 90, 91, 

114 

Foret, Audra Mi 

Forsdick, Marie . 20, 63, 

I 14 
Fowler, Terry . . 78, 1 3 I 

Fox, Lacey Ill 

Frazier, Chad . . 25, 29, 

75, 77, 100 

Fredrickson, Alisha ..Mi 

Frerman, Josh . 75, 111 

Fritsch, David Ill 

Fruin, Sarah .... 22, 52 
Fry, Jim . . 25, 29, 100 
Fulgencio, Amabel .... 7 
Fulgham, Ellen . 11, 48, 

115 



G 



Gaia, Emily 115 

Galey, Meredith .... 1 I 5 
Gallagher, Melissa 

25, 27, 48, 100, 

101 
Gallet, Monique .... I 1 5 
Gamble, John . . . 100, 

101 
Garcia, Gloria .... 101 
Garcia, Lawrence ... 1 1 5 

Garcia, Linda 52 

Garrett, Shannon 

101 

Gartman, Kelly 16 

Gaudin, Pierre 115 

Gaudin, Simone .... 1 1 5 
Geary, Brian . . 96, 1 1 5 
Geislinger, Brian .... 5 5 
Gemmer, Tracey ... 1 1 5 

Genovese, Katie 8 

Gerth, Jason 115 

Getto, Mike 24 

Gilbert, Reid . 25, 101 
Gilmore, Dr. G. ... 131 



Gilmore, Leo . . 26, 30, 
101, 102 

Gilmore, Nick 115 

Glass, Brittney IP 

Goeke, Lara ... 63, 115 

Golddman, Ben 47 

Goldman, Ben . . 46, 47, 

63, 114 

Gombos, Aerin . 36, 48, 

94, I P 

Gonzales, Al 7, 26, 

1 15 
Gonzales, Amy . 12, 81, 

I 16 

Gonzalez, Al 81 

Goreham, Amy .... 12, 

1 16 
Gormanous, Michelle 

29, 47, 86, 1 16 
Graml, Kathryn .... 1 1 6 
Grandquest, Shae .... 8 1 
Granger, Jennifer . . . 69, 

116 

Green, Matt 40 

Greenwall, Amber . . 26, 

I 16 

Gruber, Jeffrey 116 

Guneratne, Deepthi 

131 
Guneratne, Dr. R. ..131 

Gunn, Bo 81 

Gunti, Rev. F 131 



H 



Haase, Glynna . 90, 116 

Habet, Ixchel 116 

Habib, Jaleh 101, 

102 

Habib, Katrine 116 

Hafner, James 25 

Haggerty, Mary Ann . . 48 

Halaszyn, Pat 26, 

102 

Hall, Leigh E. . . 14, 46, 

47, 59, 1 16 

Halliday, Melodic ..131 

Hamilton, Anne . . 102 

Hamilton, Dr. K 30 

Hamilton, Johnnie ... 68 



INDEX 137 



Hamilton, Paula 68 

Hardin, Harry 116 

Hargrave, Sarah .... 1 1 6 
Harmless SJ, Rev. W. 

132 
Harris, Nicole . 25, 115, 

116 

Harris, Tim 102 

Harrison, Dr. P 132 

Harrison, Jaclyn .... 1 1 6 
Harrison, Wall . 75, 116 

Harry, Brian 116 

Hartrich, Jennifer ... 52, 

116 
Hartzog, Tracey .... 1 16 
Hawes, Christine ... 116 

Hayes, Ryan 116 

Healy, Bill 55 

Healy, William 38 

Healy., Bill 39 

Hebert, Lauren . . 24, 29, 
116, 134 

Helton, Joey 81 

Hempfling, Dome . . 132 
Henderson, Dr. C. . . 65, 

132 

Heneesbach, Sean ... 42, 

43, 116 

Hernosilla, Juan .... 1 16 

Herzog, James . 83, 116 

Hewitt, Emily 117 

Higgens, Duffy .... 40, 

117 
Hillery, Terry . . . 38, 83, 

117 
Hilpert, Tim . . 81, 117 

Hilperts, Jeff 117 

Hinton, Renee .... 48, 
68, 102, 103 

Hoard, Keith 92 

Holloman, Kay .... 1 1 7 

Holt, Ellen 117 

Holyfield, Lisa . . 85, 86 

Horn, Pamela 117 

Hovell, Mindy 132 

Huhbell, Theodore . . 1 17 
Huff, Valerie ... 63, 94, 

117 

Hughes, Carol 132 

Hughes, David 28, 

117 

Hughes, Will 37 

Hyland, Wes 117 



I 



Ikhimokpa, Michelle 

117 
Ingersol, Beth 48 



J 



Jackson, Jennifer ... 1 1 7 

Jacob, Alicia 117 

Jahnke, Greta . 31, 132 

James, Kelly 117 

Jernigan, Kelly 117 

Jersa, Susanne . . 10, 29, 
117 
Johnson, Buck . 20, 117 
Johnson, Dr. M. ... 132 
Johnson, Joseph .... 1 1 7 
Johnson, Latrese .... 1 1 7 
Johnson, Lori . 16, 25, 
102, 103 
Johnson, Megan . . 78, 

90, 103 
Johnson, Tanner .... 14, 

96, 1 1 7 

Jones, Shayla 103 

Joyce, Katie ... 28, 117 
fuul, Kenneth 132 



K 



Kaffer, Dr. Michael ... 7 
Kaffer, Nancy . 63, 117 
Kahn, Alison . . 76, 78, 

103 

Kahn, Philip 117 

Kaiser, Lindt 59 

Kammer, Kristen ... 12, 

1 18 

Kanade, Ravi 118 

Kelly, Jason ... 81, 118 

Kelly, Karen 103 

Kendall, Ryan 118 

Kennedy, Leon . . . 103 
Kerekes, Brooke . .103 



Kerne, Deon . . 78, 90, 
91, 103 

Keuhl, Jason 81 

Kibbe, Rebecca . 48, 86, 

118 

Kick, Beth 118 

Kinarcl, Shree 118 

Kincaid, Lee A. . 20, 24, 
34 

Klepser, Anna 118 

Kline, Kelly 118 

Knoble, Mary Janelle 

28, 57, 118 

Koch, Andy 40, 67 

Koeing, Michael .... 118 

Kojima, Alfred 132 

Kolb, Kirsten . . . 102, 

103 

Kramer, Chris . . 14, 25, 

30, 31, 84 

Krehling, Hannah . . .93 

Kreller, Jill 118 

Krulewicz, Michelle 

118 
Kulakowski, Lilah ..118 
Kupper, Robert ... 118, 

129 



L 



Labue, Jared 81 

Ladd, Dwight . 75, 118 

Landi, Dr. A 132 

Landi, Julia 63 

Lane, Thomas . . 52, 89, 

118 

Langdon, Dr. S 132 

Lariscy, Justin 118 

Laskowski, Michael 

118 

Lassose, Leslie 118 

Latino, Ben 103 

Laurence, Peter 12, 

118 

Lauten, Ray 132 

LeBlanc, Anjanettc . . 36, 
51, 63, 118 

Lee, DeCree 118 

Lee, Harper 30 

Lee, Joyce 118 



Lee, Rebecca 118 

Lee, Richard 38 

Lee, Ryan 119 

LeGault, Janna 16 

Lehman, Tom . . 40, 41, 
67 

Likely, Valerie 119 

Lindsey, Bebe 132 

Lipscomb, Oscar .... 30, 
31 

Liana, Dan 28, 83 

Lobb, Lynsey . . . 46, 59, 

119 

Loehr, Thomas 132 

Logan, Ginger 119 

Lou, Kim 36 

Lovett, Eric . . 75, 103 
Lucas, Hope .... 30, 46, 

119 

Lund, Michelle 119 

Lyons, Owen . . . 34, 55, 

119 



n 



Mabry, Erica . . . 
Maceluch, Gideet 
Macnamara, Dr. J. 
Majorkiewicz, John 
Malloy, Seann . . 
Malone, Billie S. . 
Mangelsdorl, Ellen 
Manwaring, Kelly 

63, 
Marino, Olivia . . 20 

Marsalis, John . . . 

Martin, Donmeka . 



78, 



Martin, Melissa 
Martino, Barbie 



Mason, Charles 
Massey, Angelita . . . 
Masters, Jennifer . . . 
Mathias, Jill .... 72 

Mays, Jonathon 



119 
119 
132 
119 
119 
119 
119 

103 

86, 
119 
98, 
103 

77, 
119 
119 
20, 
119 
132 
119 
119 
78, 
119 
75, 
119 



1 38 A PLACE TO GROW 



Mazdra, Michelle 




42, 103, 


104 


W*9 




103, 


107 


Moreno-Lacalle, Jose 




W* 




McCann Mike 


. 28 


Morgan, Wendy . . . 


132 
132 


I 




McCarthy, Colman . . 


.30 




McCawley, Jessica . . 
McCloskey, Erin .... 
McClughlan, John . . 


119 
1 19 
.67 


Mori, Koji 

Morris, James . . . 
Morris, foe 4 : 


i m 

104 

, 81 


Pacek, Rayne . . 86, 
Paille, Lesa . . 23, 7 b 
Palmer, Brentt 


121 

, 90 

83 


McCormick, John . . . 

67, 

McDermott, Alex . . . 


40, 
119 

• 8, 


Morris, Jor 


81 
104 

120 


Parks, Scott 

Parsons, Mitch . . . 


83 


Morris, Joseph . . . 

Morris, Kevin . 67, 


121 
31, 


119, 


129 


Mougey, Alison . . . 


120 




104 


McDowell Mart^aret 


120 


Mli, Phi 


26 

1 32 


Parsons, Todd 

Patti, Daniel 


121 


63, 


Mulloy, Josetta .... 


121 


McGill, Trae 7 


81, 


Munger, Mary . . 29 


,48, 


Patureau, Byron . . . 


52, 




120 


90, 91, 


121 


53, 


121 


McPherson, Darrell . 


.81 


Murray, Kathleen 




Payne, Father ). ... 


.29 


Meagner, Megan . . . 
Meeks, Theresa .... 


120 
120 




104 


Pearson, Sidney . . . 
Peek, David 


133 
PI 


Meilleur, Terry . . 39 
Messer, Rachel 


,43 
120 


IV 




Pendleton, Pat .... 
Perez, Edgard . . . 


83 
25, 


Messina, Amanda 

103, 
Metz, Jodi 


104 

120 


n 




Perez, Nancy 

Petite, Charles . . . 


104 

PI 
104 


Meztista, Elizabeth . . 


120 


Nalu, Jennifer . 78, 


121 


Pettis, Farrah 


1 ?1 


Miears, Kelly ... 16 
63, 


26, 
120 


Nassef, Josh 

Nelson, Christine . . 


104 

121 


Phelan, Pat 

Phi Mu 


67 
?6 


Miller, Cynthia . . 28 

Miller, Nancy . . 29, 
Milligan, Marilyn . . . 
Mims, Megan 


49, 
120 
P0 


Nesser, Tim 

Nguyen, Thao . . . 
Niland, foe 


121 
104 

.47 


Phillips, Margaret . . 

Pickels, Zack 

Plaisance, Michael . 


133 

83 

83, 


132 
120 


Nilanei, Joseph .... 
Nordhaus, Karin . . 


132 

121 


Poher, Robert . . 20, 


121 
121 


Mitchell, DeeDee . . . 


19, 

120 


Northrop, Kevin . 


104 


Poiroux, f.J 

Porter, Imani 


81 
PI 


Mitchell, Karla . 65, 
Mitchell, Patrick .... 


120 
40, 
120 


o 




Potts, Terri L 

Power, Rob 

Prerost, Julie 


PI 

40 

M3 


Mitchell, Thedia .... 
Mize, Kristie 


.19 
132 


V 




Presnell, Dan 

Pruitt, Marcus .... 


81 
PI 


Monif, Ashley . . 22 


, 83, 
120 


O'Beirne, Jaime . . . 


23, 
121 


^^^ 




Monk, Tami 


P0 


O'dwyer, George . . 


. .81 


n 




Montgomery, Carmen 
26, 94, 


120 


Obrintrer, Matrjne . . 
O^awa, Keiko .... 


. 121 
. PI 


** 




Moon, Dr. J 


132 


Orange, Dr. K. ... 


. 132 


Quina, Stephen . . . 


81 


Moore, James .. 75, 


120 


Ori, Michael 


.121 






Moore, Lauren . . 48 


,94, 
120 


Ory, Mike 


. .55 


n 






Osiecki, Jennifer . 


■ 15, 




Moore, Michael . . . 


120 




104 


_§%_ 




Moore, Norman . 36, 65 


Oubre, Corey . . 43, 


121 






Moore, Tara 


86 






Rabal, Brian 


81 


Moran, Molly 


P0 






Radulski, Sara . 63, 


121 


Moran, Olivia .... 


120 










Moran, Stephanie 


38, 











Rahal, Bryan 121 

Rametta, Brad 122 

Ramey, Eloise . 78, 122 

Ramos, Addie 122 

Randol, Bo 4() 

Rapier, Regina 122 

Ray, Amanda 122 

Reed, Becky 39, 43, 

122 

Reed, Joyelle 104 

Reese, Christopher . . 122 

Reeves, Joseph . . . 6, 38, 

42, 122 

Regan SJ, Rev. G. ..133 

Renkl, Amanda 122 

Rewak SJ, Father W. 

2, 3, 30 
Reynolds, Thomas . . 122 

Rhames, Dan 81 

Rice, Nate 83 

Rich, Mende 19 

Rimes SJ, Rev. R. . . 28, 

133 
Ritch, Mende . . 19, 123 
Rives, Aaron . . 40, 123 
Rives, Sarah ... 25, 48, 
104, 123 
Robbert, Suzanne 

38, 102, 104 
Roberts, Barbara 

104, 105 
Roberts, David 83, 

123 

Roberts, Jennifer ... 123 

Robichaux, Robbie . . 55, 

83, 96 

Robinson, Kimberlyn 

123 
Robinson, Linda .... 133 
Robinson, Ronald . . 75, 

123 
Rodretrues, Fernando 

88 
Roselle, Christopher 

123 

Ross, Michael 123 

Rousso, Mary A 26 

Rubio, Miryam . 29, 44, 

123 

Ruffin, Daphne 123 

Rush, Lynn 124 

Russell, Erin .... 44, 52, 

124 



INDEX 139 



Russo, Marianne ... 26, 
39, 43, 86, 124 
Ryan, Tara . . 101, 104, 
122 
Rys, Kevin .... 53, 12 4 
Rys, Kimberly 105 



s 



Saint, Susan L24 



Saint, Susie . . 
Salathe, Scott 

Salinas, Tatiana 

Salmon, Shawna 63 

Salsiccia, Jeff 



51, 90 

19, 28, 

53, 105 

. . . 124 



18, 43, 
124 
.. 124 
. . 133 



Sandahl, Trisha . 
Sanders, Leola . . 

Sauget, Anne 124 

Sayasy, Deinit 124 

Scalia, Brent 124 

Scalici, Jennifer . . 20, 57, 
86, 



Scanlin, Timothy 
Scheldt, Mike . . 28, 
Schmelzer, Colleen . 
12 
Schmidt, Spankie . . 
Schraeder, Leslie . 
Schuessler, Penny 
Schuler, Todd 
Schwalm, Pauline 
Scott, Bridgette 
Scott, Christopher 
Scott, J.T. . . . 
Seals, J anon . . 
Sens, Templa . 
Sensel, Amy . 



Sestrian, Aeron 
Seymore, Elise 



124 
124 
124 

1 1, 
124 
124 
105 
.38 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
25, 105, 
106 

40 

. 12, 36, 



124 

Shaffer, David 53 

Shapard, Nathan 

105, 106 
Shaw, Angela .... 106 

Shehee, Joyce 63 

Simoncini, Tony .... 25, 
81, 124 



Sims, Coach Frank ... 8 1 
Sims, Mark ... 83, 125 

Slocum, Jaime L25 

Smith, Christina .... 52, 

57, 125 
Smith, Jamila 



?? 



61, 65, 125 

Smith, Jon 125 

Smith, Katrina . 94, 125 

Smith, Megan . . 39, 43, 

46, 47 

Sommer, Monique ..125 

Sparks, Stephen .... 11, 

12, 38, 39, 42, 43, 

125 

Spence, Heather . 

Spencer, Princess 



Sprague, Brenclen . . . 

Sprague, Patrick . . . . 
Spreckelsen, Rudolph 



125 
19, 

125 
26, 

125 

125 

125 
Springer, Bobbi .... 133 

Stapp, Brandi 2, 6, 

125 

Starr, Barbara 133 

Starr, Dr. M. . . 18, 133 

Starr, Jessica .... 18, 28, 

63, 125 

Statt, Gretchen 125 

Steen, John . . . 20, 43, 
81, 106 

Stephans, Chris 83 

Stevens, Emily ... 8, 52, 
57, 125 

Stevens, Scott 125 

Stokes, Esther 133 

Stokes, Stephen 81 

Stone, Travis 83 

Stover, Erin .... 63, 90, 
125 

Straub, Renee 125 

.16 
78, 
125 
125 
133 
125 
.63 
133 
.83 
125 



Strickland, Shauna 
Stuardi, Lindsey . 

Sullivan, Patricia 
Sullivan, Wanda 
Sulzbacher, Paul 
Surline, Jennifer 
Susina, David . 
Swanson, Casey 
Sweeney, Jake 



Swenk, Jason 125 

Swingle, Ira 133 

Symons, Chris 81 

Szady, Anita 126 

T 

Ta, Julie 126 

Takushige, Junko ... 126 
Teasdale, Susannah 

106 

Tedesco, Kerri . . 25, 27, 

126 

Tetley, Elizabeth ... 126 

Theriot, Marisa .57, 94, 

95, 126 

Thiel, Michael 126 

Thiry, Renee . . . 90, 9 1 
Thomas, Denise . . 106 
Thomas, Lanesha ... 126 
Thompson, Glenda 

133 
Thompson, Jessica 

86, 106 
Thompson, Mark ... 81, 
133 
Thompson, Matthew 

126 
Thomson, Mark .... 133 
Thorell, Kathryn ... 126 
Timmons, Eddie . . 29, 

75, 106 
Tisdale, Candice .... 126 
Travers, John . . . 40, 67 
Triplett, Daphne ... 126 
Trujillo, Karen . . 20, 44, 

86, 126 

Tsaltas, Maggie . 20, 48, 

126 

Tupper, Ben 126 

Tumi, Alice 126 

Turpin, Damie 86 



Uteg, Valerie 

Uter, Colin . . . 



. .106 

;l, 126 



U 



Ullo, Tommy . . 24, 126 
Usher, Brad 53 



V 



van Pottelsberghe, 
Brian 106 

VanDer Griff, Tevis .40, 

41, 126 

Verdone, Christina . . 126 

Veres, Daniel 81 

Vines, Tracey .... 86, 

106 

Vinson, Joss 81 

Viscardi SJ, Rev. 

Christopher 133 

Vondenstein, Melissa 

126 
Vondernstein, Mike . .37 



w 



Walker, James . . 78 
Walley, Maria . . 20 

Walls, Meredith 

Walters, Brooks . 
Washington, Lydia 
Watson, John . . 
Watson, Jonathan 
Watts, Cheryl 
Weber, Brian . 
Weber, Kath . 
Weiss, Deborah 
Welch, Amy . 
Wesco, Benitta 
Wess, Dr. C. . 
West, Alvin ... 22, 

Wheeler, Rory . 75 
Wheelock, Horacio . 

White, Dean 

Whitman, Angelle . 
10, 20, 109. 
Wilder, Karen . . . 



,90, 
133 

, 28, 
126 
106 
126 
126 
.83 
127 
.17 
127 
133 
127 
127 
127 
.22 

115, 
127 
127 
• 3, 
15 
127 
. 6, 
127 
106 



140 A PLACE TO GROW 



Williams, Ella . 78, 127 


rw 


Williams, Gidget ... 127 


M t 


Williams, Rae 16 


Mj 


Williams, Taylor ...127 




Williams, Wycondia 


Zingarelli, Chris . 6, 128 


127 


Zirlott, Kent . . 6, 101, 


Williams Sj, Rev. M. 


107 


133 




Willis, Jabaria . 19, 127 




Wilson, Chad 106 




Wilson, Izzy 12, 57, 




86 




Wilson, Mark . 11, 127 




Wilson, Robert 127 




Wilson, Tracey 127 




Wimpey, Todd 2 1 




Wingard, Heather . . 78, 




91, 127 




Wingbermuehle, Steve 




83 




Winland, Brian 8 1 




Witrey, Catherine . . .127 




Wittenbrink, Patrick 




127 




Woelke, Chad 127 




Wofford, Heather ... 38 




Wolfort, Heather 




106 




Woodyard, Donya . . 127 




Wooldndge, Zion ... 8 1 




Woolridge, Zion .... 72 




Workman, Patty . . . 86, 




127 




Worley, Brett . . 81, 127 




Wuest, Alison \~>1 





Y 



Yanes, Sean 128 

Yates, Marcelyn .... 128 

Yester, Katie 29, 

106, 107 

York, Mary 133 

York, Molly . . 25, 106, 

107 
Yots, Holly 48, 86, 

128 



INDEX 141 




h 





-Eh 



OH/l 




A 

The seeds of students 
that had planted them- 
selves on campus in the 
fall had weatherd a full 
year and there were 
many growths. Many 
had bloomed, while a 
few withered away. We 

PLACE 

all found something we 
were good at (athletics, 
academics, leadership, 
friendships) and that 
made us special. What- 
ever it was that made us 
each unique, we all 
found it on the Hill, our 
place to shine. 

TO SHINE 



x 



he Sodality Chapel is located in a 
secluded spot on campus. Its reclusiveness 
made for a great spot for peace and quiet. 



142 A PLACE TO GROW 







A PLACE TO SHINE 143 



My Thoughts 

I am disappointed in this book, it is not what I had 
dreamed it would be. My dreams included a lull stall 
of writers and photographers ready and eager to help 
produce a major publication for this campus. What I 
got was a few people willing to write a lew pieces of 
copy and take a few pictures. I am eternally gratelul 
to those few of you. I also got Shinonne Edwards. 
She completed the entire clubs section for me. She was 
great. There a lew others to thank, but I will get to 
that later. 

I would like to say that those few volunteers, 
Shivonne, and especially myself worked very hard on 
this book. I did all that I could do. I was super Hope. 
For that reason I am still proud of mysell, if not the 
book. This book is a reflection ol what one person 
(basically) can do by herself. (A person who is a 
psychology major, not journalism). II you cannot 
appreciate this book, then appreciate the lact that I 
did it by myself. 

Now then, I'd like to thank my mother lor contin- 
ually pushing me to completion. Thanks to Staci 
Sullivan, my best friend, for her moral support. 
Thank you Bobbie Springer - I know that you are 
disappointed but it was tough all alone and thanks for 
the last minute rushes on information and pictures. 
Thanks to the few of you who were actually concerned 
and did not say "You mean you're not done with it 
YET????" You are the few true. Thank you to Heath- 
er, Amy, Leigh Ellen, Ben, J anna, and Rae for never 
looking down on me, even when I am imperfect. 

Most of all, I just want to let everyone know that at 
times I did want to give up. However, I wanted you 
to have it. It is a piece of history now, and I did it. 
Thank you to those ol you who believed in me. A. 
Hope Lucas, Torch Editor '96-'97 



Editor - Hope Lucas 

Organizations - 
Shivonne Edwards 

Moderator - Bobbie 
Springer 

Contributing writers: 

Maria Wally, Kelly 

Dyson, Latrese 

Johnson, and Heather 

Bell. 



Thank you Beinville Photography for providing all the professional pic- 
tures. 

Thank yon to the Springhillian editors over the past year and your staffs for 
the use of your archive pictures. 



This 73rd edition of the Torch was printed by Taylor publishing Company 
in Dallas, Texas. All pages were created on the staff computer using the 
UltraVision program. Mr. Ben Allen was the Taylor Representaive. 



144 A PLACE TO GROW